No UV Filters on DSLR?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by MikeSakamoto, Feb 22, 2006.

  1. MikeSakamoto

    MikeSakamoto TPF Noob!

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    Is it ture that you don't need an UV filter on digital because the sensors filter UV automatically? How about general protection of the lens? What do you guys normally do? Thanks.
     
  2. slickhare

    slickhare TPF Noob!

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    i put one on my Olyumpus E500. even if you don't need the UV filtering, it's good to have one on your lens to protect it. just spend $2.00 to protect your lens so you don't have to spend $200 if it gets damaged.
     
  3. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    I'm not sure whether the sensors actually filter out UV or not (it probably depends on the particular brand / model), but it's always a good idea to keep something in front of your lens like a UV filter simply for protection, and UVs are the best for that because they're clear and they're cheap. It's a heck of a lot better to get a scratch on a $30 UV filter than on the front element of a $500 lens.

    I almost always keep a filter on my main lens (my other 2 lenses I could care less about). If I'm not using a polarizer, then most likely I'm keeping my UV filter on there.

    The main reason to use a UV filter is mostly just for the protection, IMO.
     
  4. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    Ah, slickhare beat me to the 'submit' button ;-)
     
  5. slickhare

    slickhare TPF Noob!

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    but you gave a more thorough explanation :mrgreen: touche!
     
  6. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    Ok then, I'll admit defeat. I win. :p
     
  7. slickhare

    slickhare TPF Noob!

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    :scratch:....................:cheer:
     
  8. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    I didn't use them on either my film or digital lenses once I started shooting mostly non-landscapes. I handle my lenses carefully and it's another piece of glass that can cause flare and other issues.

    A lot of people won't see the difference, so a lot depends on how clutzy you are.
     
  9. MikeSakamoto

    MikeSakamoto TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for your input, guys! I know some pros say it causes flare or other things to degrade the quality of the pics, but I'll probably put them on to protect it.
     
  10. crawdaddio

    crawdaddio TPF Noob!

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    I hate the flare and (sometimes) ghosting they cause. For everyday shooting I don't use them because I am careful with my equipment. If I were to go on a serious outing (mountain hiking, sandy, wet environments, really active stuff, etc....) I would probably use them for protection.
     
  11. Dweller

    Dweller Inconspicuous Supporter

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    I put one on my lens before it even made it to the camera. The one I got was labelled as being for digital but I just wanted something protecting the lens. I tend to take my camera on hikes and bike rides and I have a 3 year old that thinks Daddies camera is the coolest thing ever so in my case a uv/protection filter is a must.

    The filter I got also has a very thin frame to help avoid vignetting.

    I just found the case and its a "Quantary Professional Filter Series" Protector/UV
     
  12. Peanuts

    Peanuts TPF Noob!

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    I also tend to use a UV filter just to protect the lens. If, say, I am taking pictures where the camera will not be moving (for instance landscapes on tripod or 'portraiture') if I remember I will take it off. But, I find them rather handy, for instance, when I do experiments involving liquids, especially something such as milk such as earlier this week. I had cleaned the lens off after, but apparently missed a splash of milk on the UV filter When I pulled it out yesterday, I had to scrub pretty hard to get it off, and still, I can't be certain if it is all gone, so I am thankful it was my filter as opposed to the lens itself.
     

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