Noob with a new XT and Q about lenses

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by reconstyle, Dec 24, 2007.

  1. reconstyle

    reconstyle TPF Noob!

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    I just picked up the rebel XT kit with the 18-55mm lens, and I am sort of learning all the functions of the camera, and all the terminology and things. So far I think I'm doing fairly well. It's definitely a HUGE upgrade from my SD630 :hail:

    I can see my self wanting to get a better lens in the near future, preferably something with more zoom. Most of the time I will use the camera to just take pictures of friends and family, some indoors and some outdoors, some during the day, and some at night. I THINK that the lens in the kit will be okay for those applications. Occasionally though, I would like to take the camera to sporting events ranging from baseball games, to just me and my friends playing some football or even my dog running around the park at 200 miles an hour.

    So my question is, what would be the best lens for me? I am on somewhat of a budget here, under $200....maybe??
     
  2. Buszaj

    Buszaj TPF Noob!

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    Probably one of the 75-300s or 70-300s that Canon makes; they're not too expensive, and as long as you have sufficient lighting, they should serve you well.
     
  3. ABlythe

    ABlythe TPF Noob!

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    Welcome to The Photo Forum. Congratulations on your new camera, and I'm glad you're excited at the thought of expanding your assortment of lenses. For the uses that you have given, something in the 70-300 range would work well for you. Let me add that the internet is an endless source of information, with that being said, take advantage of it! Hop onto Google (or your choice of search engine) and look up reviews on the different glasses in your price range. This is really going to be the only way to make sure you're getting the best "bang for your buck." You will often times find in-depth reviews, sample images, pros, cons, prices, etc.. all at one website.

    I noticed that you mentioned about shooting different sports, including basketball. I'm not experienced in all areas of sport photography, however I have shot a basketball game before. Be prepared for poor lighting and quick movements. To compensate for this, you can either fork out a lot of money for a "fast glass (lens)" or do mixture of things. Up the ISO, shoot as close to the floor as possible, and shoot at the lowest aperture as possible. This will allow the most lighting in, and if you're shooting close the floor you'll be right up next to the action. Thus, no need to zoom that much aka less camera shake!

    Again, by no means am I a professional, as I'm still in the learning stages as well. However, I just figured I would share some valuable information I've learned so far in hopes that you don't have to spend a lot of time questioning settings, lenses, etc.. and spend more time shooting outstanding photographs!

    Good luck!
     

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