OK I gotta ask...

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Nacho, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. Nacho

    Nacho TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2008
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Nevada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    All these numbers and codes and crap from these DSLR's mean pretty much nothing to me.
    Some of the features I can understand, but for the most part it is all jibberish to me.
    Basically I want to photograph critters that are probably going to be a LONG ways off, at least 50, maybe 200 yards. We have some of the spookiest deer and elk around, if they even hint of a human they are gone.
    There are some exceptions, one where I had a doe not 10 feet from me while taking my morning leak, but I can't count on that to happen again.

    SO...
    If I want to be able to shoot critters from that far away, what should I have? I look at the different lenses and cameras and it means nothing to me.
     
  2. JmPhotos

    JmPhotos TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You need a zoom lens. I have a 70 - 300mm zoom lens. I can get pretty closeup shots with it and it won't break the bank to buy it. Mine was like $200.00. The higher the number the closer you can zoom in. Big professional sports photog's usually use about a 500mm zoom lens.
    50mm is about what the human eye sees.

    HTH
     
  3. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Messages:
    7,500
    Likes Received:
    478
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I wouldn't seriously shoot wildlife with anything less than a 300 f/4 or 200-400 f/4.
     
  4. ronenfox

    ronenfox TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Philly
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    So if 50 mm is what the human eye sees, then at its max magnification, wouldn't the lens only be about 6x zoom? It wouldn't do much for an elk 600 feet away.
     
  5. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    In a darkroom far, far away...
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The longer the better. At least 300mm. Do your Harvard best to be llonger than that.
     
  6. Dubious Drewski

    Dubious Drewski TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    909
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    That's not quite right. 50m is what the human eye sees yes, but the average point-and-shoot (Which uses the 3X 4X 6X etc measurements) starts at 28mm. So a 300mm lens is really more like 11X zoom.

    Believe us, 300mm is a good average zoom to use. Have you ever looked through one?

    EDIT: although trying to shoot anything 600 feet away would be a challenge for even top-end gear, so don't get your hopes up unless you can somehow get closer to your subjects.
     
  7. Rogan

    Rogan TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    just a quick question while on this subject,

    my Finepix camera(S5600) has a 10X optical zoom. so if we were talking in dSLR lenses, what ##mm-##mm wud that relate to, roughly?
     
  8. Nacho

    Nacho TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2008
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Nevada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks much for the replies, now I at least have a clue what I am looking for. :mrgreen:
     
  9. LateModelSedan

    LateModelSedan TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Finepix S5600: 38 - 380 mm (35 mm equiv) 10x optical zoom

    the formula to calculate the optical zoom is to divide the higher number by the lower number.
     
  10. EricBrian

    EricBrian TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    503
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You should really start to learn what all those numbers mean, though. They will be important when you start to take pictures of those hard-to-get critters. It took me a little but I am learning more and more as I go along.
     
  11. audiobomber

    audiobomber TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2008
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sudbury ON, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The average point and shoot starts at 35 mm, not 28. So 11X zoom on the average p&s would be 385mm in terms of 35mm equivalent. An APS-C DSLR camera (i.e. low or medium priced camera) has an inherent crop factor due to its reduced sensor size compared to full frame, which provides some inherent magnification of the focal length.

    An APS-C Nikon, Sony or Pentax will give you about 450 mm focal length with a 300mm lens, comparable to 13X zoom with most point & shoot cameras. Additionally, the image will have better resolution than the point & shoot image, and can be cropped more aggressively, adding more magnification (AKA digital zoom).

    For the OP, here's an excellent tutorial on focal length: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/camera-lenses.htm
     
  12. Mav

    Mav TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2008
    Messages:
    1,457
    Likes Received:
    2
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    "Normal" is more like 28-35mm as in what the human eye sees in terms of crop factor cameras, and I personally hate the 'x' zoom ratio stuff anyways. All it does is describe the range of the lens and not what it'll actually see. The Sigma 200-500mm lens will see further than a 70-300mm zoom. But the Sigma is only a "2.5x" zoom whereas the 70-300 is "4.3x". It tells you nothing other than the range of the lens. A shorter view than both of these is the Nikon 18-200mm lens, which is 11.1x.

    Anyways, most pro wildlife photographers learn to get much much closer than 200 yards and also learn how to get friendly with the animals. If you seriously want to pick stuff off 200 yards away, a 300mm isn't gonna cut it. People that do that stuff use 300, 400, 500, or 600mm primes with teleconverters on top of that to get them even further. This stuff costs major bucks, like as much as a decent used car. On a budget, a stabilized 70-300 IS/VR lens would probably be a good bet, or a 300mm f/4 prime with or without stabilization. Beyond that a Nikon 80-400VR or the Canon 100-400IS are the next best bet at about $1000 each. And after that you're looking at serious money. A camera that does well at high ISO would be a big help too.
     

Share This Page