Ok so filter talk

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by mwcfarms, Jun 16, 2010.

  1. mwcfarms

    mwcfarms No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have looked at the different types of filters available and my options. I really plan on shooting landscapes this summer as much as I can to improve my skills and I am looking to get a circular polarizing filter and a neutral density filter. Now I live on the farm in Rural alberta and closest city is an hour and a half away. I will be heading there this weekend but looking at the stores prices compared to say Amazon, Adorama and B&H they are much higher. If someone could give me a couple tips or comments on these filters I would really appreciate it. The last questions I have is I have seen the 4x6 cokin/lee filters and have also seen the circular neutral density filters. Is it bad to go circular. just thinking it might be easier and cheaper. These are a couple I have seen on B&H.

    B+W | 67mm #102 Neutral Density (ND) 0.6 | 66-012188 | B&H Photo

    B+W | 67mm Circular Polarizer Filter | 66-044842 | B&H Photo

    from amazon:
    [ame=http://www.amazon.com/67mm-Neutral-Density-Glass-Filter/dp/B0000BZL8D/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1276717557&sr=8-12]Amazon.com: B + W 67mm #102 Neutral Density Glass Filter - 0.6 - 4X: Electronics[/ame] although i might have to route this twice from canada. I would love to stay around 150/200 if I can. I know good filters will last a long time but I would love to save some money if possible.
     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    You can't go wrong with B+W filters. They're expensive, but worth it. I would definitely get the polarizer first but I would recommend purchasing the Graduated NDs before straight NDs.
     
  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Cokin filters are not all that good. Lee's filters are better. Both are resin filters but the Lee filters give truer colors.

    Many buy the rectangular filters (but no filter holder) and just hold them in front of the lens since the camera is usually on a tripod anyway. Also by when using GND filters by just holding them you can put the gradation demarcation line wherever in the frame you want it. GND's come with a hard demarcation or a soft demarcation and it's easy to wind up with quite a few different ones.

    CPL filters have to be rotated to adjust their effect so what people do is by a round one that fits the front of the largest lens they have and then just buy step down rings so it will work on smaller glass.

    The only trouble is, as filters get bigger, they get more expensive.

    The B+W CPL you linked to is a good one because it is multi-coated (MRC).

    ND filters can usually be stacked (screwed together) so if you have 0.3 and a 0.6, with both together you also have 0.9 without having to buy an 0.9.
     
  4. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    True, IF you don't use a good lens hood. I have an 8x10" piece of matte-black craft foam that I use to form a lens hood for my Cokin filters. A bit cumbersome at times, yes, but then a Cokin 1 stop G-ND will run about $35 in 'P' size in Canada; a Lee or Singh-Ray? More like $120.
     
  5. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The CP looks fine. For neutral density filters I would suggest that you consider going to a square/rectangle system. One filter to fit every lens you own. Cheaper in the long run. Lee and Singh-Ray are top quality filters. If you choose to go the Cokin route keep in mind that there are many report of color cast issues with the Cokin ND filters. Hi Tech NDs are also a good choice on a budget. Good resource for filters. Tiffen ND Gradual Filters Schneider ND Gradual Camera Filters, Lee HiTech 4x4 and Cokin Z Pro filters
     
  6. mwcfarms

    mwcfarms No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Ok so something like this then for graduated neutral density. (Lee's too much $$$)

    Hitech | 4x5" Graduated Neutral Density (ND) 0.6 | HT1407

    which i looked up is supposed to fit in this holder?

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/459621-REG/Cokin_CBP40067_P_Series_Filter.html

    Now i see that it says 67mm adapter which currently is my largest lens. Or do I buy the one with no ring.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/459608-REG/Cokin_CBP400A_P_Series_Filter.html

    Sorry to be such a tool/pain in your arse but until I get this into my hands Im not sure of its mechanics or how it works. So when I buy a bigger lense I just buy a new kit slotted with the ring for that size of lens? Thanks for all your input guys I really appreciate it.
     

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