okay so I adjusted my ISO and Apature (sp)

Discussion in 'The Professional Gallery' started by tkme4ard, Nov 3, 2005.

  1. tkme4ard

    tkme4ard TPF Noob!

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    I just don't get it :( I get now that ISO deals in graininess and that the more light you have the higher the number more crisp, indoors lower number, less light available. Right? Apature I don't get. From what I read I adjusted for outside, blurry background, no flash set in AV mode on my digital rebel but it looks like the pictures are still over exposed. Don't they look way too orange? (the kids)

    [​IMG] still trying to get pictures for Christmas cards done and I don't think I like this one any better than the ones I took last week

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    this one I like but I'm thinking she's just photogenic ROFL her pictures tend to turn out great and the rest of the :p

    my neighbors girls wanted to be models too so I gave that a whirl
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Ihaveaquestion

    Ihaveaquestion TPF Noob!

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    I want to know this one too.

    The pictures look good to me though?
     
  3. Taralyn Romero

    Taralyn Romero TPF Noob!

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    Oooook, so I'm not a professional or anything but this is what I understand of it:
    ISO - the lower the number (i,e. 100 vs 400), the sharper the image. 400 will be granier than the 100 speed because generally you are working with less light. As far as aperature goes, the lower the number (i.e. the larger the opening), the more blurry your background becomes. An high aperature number of 16 will produce a very sharp image but you will have to have a lot of light (or a slow shutter speed) to make the picture come out. An aperature of 1 or whatever will blurr the background quite a bit and you can have a very high shutter speed since your aperature opening will be wide and will let in a lot of light. Does that make sense?

    By the way, and again no professional, but I think your pictures look fine! The first would be my choice for the x-mas card :)
     
  4. clemeys

    clemeys TPF Noob!

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    My understanding is what Taralyn said. Compared to your last post w/ the river in the background, these are hands down better imo. Good job. Would like to see a little larger apurture in #1 so the bg would be more blurry, but if you are not gonna shoot anymore, go w/ it for the card!
     
  5. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    They look perfectly all right to me for a Christmas card!
    The leaves form a neutral, albeit recognisable, background to me, but since in the first (which I deem is best for your card!) there is nothing other than leaves in their background, this is fine. They need not be more blurred, in my opinion.
    And all three children's eyes come out in detail, which is nice!
    Go for it.
    The first one is it.
    Don't you think so?
     
  6. jstuedle

    jstuedle No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    In simple terms, the aperture controls the volume of light through the lens in a given time. Shutter obviously control that time. Each "click" of the aperture is either 1/2 or 2X the volume of light. Lets say you have a lens with a max aperture of F/4.0. Stop down 1 click and half as much light comes through the lens at any given shutter speed. F/5.6 is 1/2 of f/4.0. Therefore, f/8 would be 1/4, f/11 1/8th and so on. The shutter speed dial is set up the same way, either 1/2 or 2X the amount of time with each click. (Also notice your film speed is also in multiples of 2 generally) So, lets say you have a setting of 1/125 sec @ f/8. You would have the exact same exposure, the same amount of light reaching the film if you set the camera at 1/60th sec. @ f/11, or 1/250 sec. @ f/5.6. Photography is a series of trade-offs. The smaller the aperture, the more depth of focus you have. The faster the shutter, the more action you stop. The art of photography is using these variables as tools to perfect your craft as art.
     
  7. tkme4ard

    tkme4ard TPF Noob!

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    well my dh didn't like the fall leaves as a background for christmas cards :rolleyes: so I'm off to the drawing board again. I'm going to play with my camera again and see what happens.

    thank you for your explanations :) I think if I play with it I'll get it
     
  8. Alison

    Alison Swiss Army Friend Supporting Member

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    I think this series is a huge improvement from the first set that you posted. And you're exactly right, keep practicing and you'll soon find it becomes a lot easier! Have fun finding the perfect background to please your husband :lol:
     
  9. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Ach :(

    "dh" is "dear husband" then?
    Heehee :D.
    Didn't know that until I had read Alison's post ;).
     
  10. Alison

    Alison Swiss Army Friend Supporting Member

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    I depends on your mood, it can be dear, or darn at times :mrgreen:
     
  11. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    I don't think this particular point has been addressed simply and correctly yet, or I didn't read the replies properly?

    The more light you have i.e sunny outdoors, the lower number iso you can use e.g 100 or 200.

    The less light you have i.e indoors without flash or outdoors at night time, the higher iso you can use e.g 400 or at a stretch 800

    But always try to use the lowest iso you can to reduce grain & keep it to a minimum.:thumbup:
     
  12. matthudd

    matthudd TPF Noob!

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    ISO/ASA is the 35mm/Med Format etc to how light reacts with the film, for example:
    Iso 1600 - Indoors very little light, it will make the sensor/film react quicker to light.
    Iso 100 - Bright daylight or studio lighting film doesnt need to react as fast as there is plenty of light.
    As the ISO/ASA reaches higher numbers, the level of grain or "noise" increases.

    Aperture:
    This is a small or wide opening of the shutter. for example:
    F2.8 Wide open aperture more light reaches the sensor or film and immediate focu of the camera is detail with everything else thrown out of focus
    F32 Shutter is only open a small way therefore capturing all the detail in the image not just one section but this means you may have to use a slower shutter speed, IE around 1/30th or 1/60th maybe on a bright day?
     

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