Old film

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Actor, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. Actor

    Actor TPF Noob!

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    I have two rolls of 120 Fujicolor NPC 160 that were left over from a project a few years ago (2002 or 2003 I think). It's been in a refrigerator ever since. It's "pro" film and so does not have the preservatives that consumer film has. I'm wondering if it's any good. I've heard that the primary effect of aging on film is a change in film speed, and you can get good results if you allow for this change. If this is true then I suspect that the direction of the change is for the film to get slower. I thinking of exposing it as ASA 100 or 125. Comments?
     
  2. randerson07

    randerson07 TPF Noob!

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    Whats the expiration date on the rolls? If it was cold stored I dont think there will be any problems.

    Ive shot some film that is 2 years expired that I bought from a local grocery store, that was probably never cold stored and on the shelf for years. It was a mix of Tmax 100, and Elite Chrome 200 and I didnt see any issues with them.
     
  3. Actor

    Actor TPF Noob!

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    There is no expiration date on the rolls. They came out of a pro-pack of five, the only way the local photo store will sell 120 film. There may have been an expiration date on the original box but it is long gone.

    I'm pretty sure the emulsions you mention are consumer film which is designed to last longer. I don't think any consumer emulsions are available with 120 film. For that matter I don't think I've ever seen a professional film with an expiration date. The assumption seems to be that a pro will shoot it quickly and not store it.
     

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