Old single Raw pictures processed HDR

Discussion in 'HDR Discussions' started by Provo, Oct 28, 2009.

  1. Provo

    Provo TPF Noob!

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    These are old RAW images from my old camera that I just processed
    what are your thoughts? Shot using fuji e900 I wanted to preserve the realistic feal in photomatix and in photoshop withought feeling like an oil painting

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  2. Bynx

    Bynx TPF Noob!

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    I like both your shots, particularly the sky. Nice job not making it look like an HDR. I would crop your first shot from the bottom just at the tip of the tallest cactus. They dont benefit the picture and look more obtrusive than helpful. Besides that they are chopped off and make the pic look incomplete somehow.
     
  3. McNugget801

    McNugget801 TPF Noob!

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    This is not HDR.. its tonemapping.
     
  4. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Been thinking about that, actually...

    A RAW file contains enough data to pull about 3 stops out of it.

    Global exposure changes can thus be used to render out 3 images that show them; 1 underexposed, 1 overexposed, 1 neutral.

    Those three differently exposed (in post) images made from the RAW are then combined in an HDR editor program, JUST LIKE three differently exposed images made by the shutter, in order to produce a result that displays more dynamic range than any one of the three alone can.

    How's that not HDR?
     
  5. McNugget801

    McNugget801 TPF Noob!

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    So I guess that means that every photo shot in RAW is already HDR?

    From HDR soft. (Photomatix Help - Working with RAW files)
     
  6. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Well, I think maybe we could say that it has the information and potential to be used to produce an HDR image.

    I mean, if we just bracket by one stop each, and then use those three files as is to output TIFs or JPGs for the HDR editor, do we get any more information than using the three stops we have built into the middle neutral RAW file? I don't know, but I'm not seeing it.

    Let's put it this way - suppose the three shots were JPGs straight out of the camera, where we couldn't really adjust exposure the way we can with RAW. So, we're stuck with what we got in those JPGs. But we could still make an HDR from them.

    But we CAN adjust the RAW file to get those 3 JPGs as output files, and aren't we then in the exact same place?

    And really, the end result is all that really matters, isn't it? What we end up being able to actually see in the end version? If the resultant image reveals more dynamic range in the image to our eyeballs than any of the individual 'straight up' photos, haven't we achieved the whole point of the exercise?

    Think about this...

    On the one hand, we could take three separate photos and bring them together and still work the HDR settings so that it doesn't 'look' like an HDR at all - or we can go totally overboard.

    On the other hand, we could take three images from a single RAW, bring them together in and HDR editor and do the same thing.

    So, what's the real difference if we get to the same place?

    Yeah, I just don't know that I'm buying into that notion. We can't even see RAW files. We can't post them, we can't look at them, they don't exist to us, except as digital information. We can only see an interpretation of them, which is the tone mapped image.

    So now we're back to the idea that what we have as an end result is really all that matters - to our actual eyeballs - no matter how we got there.

    If we use multiple files that individually deliver detail in shadows, highlights and mid-tones that none of them can do all by itself, from any source be it 3 shutter actuations or 3 RAW exposure conversions, and then we pull them together and tone map them to deliver a single image that displays all of them, I can't see the difference.

    Saying one is HDR and the other isn't seems like little more than semantics to me.

    Your mileage may vary, of course...
     
  7. McNugget801

    McNugget801 TPF Noob!

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    Whatever floats your boat man

    Do you honestly thing you are going to get better results from a single RAW image compared to multiple exposures :lmao:
     
  8. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I don't recall saying "better", but I'd be willing to say "equal" - in many cases.

    Do you honestly think that 3 JPGs straight out of the camera provide more information than a single RAW?

    Every time we make an exposure of a high contrast scene, we make a choice to expose for the highlights, the mid-tones or the shadows, based on what we think is important to deliver the message we're trying to convey with that photograph.

    That said, if the scene isn't extremely high contrast (black dog wearing a black velvet sweater standing in fresh white snow at high noon with no clouds, for example), all the detail information for all three is often in a single RAW file.

    As long as we can pull out three exposures that give us the detail from shadows through highlights, how is it "better" (to use your word) to get them at the shutter with three JPGs rather than in post from a single RAW?
     
  9. Bynx

    Bynx TPF Noob!

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    Instead of hijacking this thread why not start your own on what is an HDR? Technically a raw file processed as an HDR is not a true one. Technically. But optically what's the difference?
     
  10. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    He asked what our thoughts are, and we're giving them. Those thoughts were sparked by his submission, so I think there's a good chance they're relevant.

    If it's really that big a deal though, I'm sure a mod can move them. :D

    Hey! Why don't you start your own thread to put out your opinions on what RAW is (technically) instead of hijacking this one?!

    j/k ;)
     
  11. NateS

    NateS TPF Noob!

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    Considering that I take my bracketed exposures 2 stops apart for a total of 6 stops of exposure "spread", yes, I can get more out of 3 jpegs than I can from a single raw. Granted I always shoot raw, but when doing a HDR< I just do a straight conversion of the three shots into three Jpegs.

    As for the images posted. If this was with a single raw file, you could have gotten the same results (probably much better) but doing a proper edit on the single file than by doing a faux-HDR with the single file. The data is there either way, but doing an actual edit gives you more control over how the final scene looks.
     
  12. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    So, you prefer a 'shotgun' approach to shooting, rather than exposing specifically for the highlights, the shadows and the mid-tones.

    Whatever works for ya... :thumbup::D
     

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