one step film developing!!!

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by jbnhl, Apr 24, 2005.

  1. jbnhl

    jbnhl TPF Noob!

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    OK, today I went to my local barnes and noble bookstore and like always instead of buying those expensive photo books, i just sat and read a few for about an hour. Anyway, i came across this chapter that dealt with developing film, and it had some very promising techniques. This one was about processing film, in the film canister, in daylight, with only one chemical!! and of course the water rinse afterward, but anyway, i wanna learn more and i dont know where to start, i searched online for info and these suposed PQ, MQ or Xtol developers are what i need to get ahold of to develope and fix in one step. If anybody knows anything about this please share, the idea of not having to roll the film on those reels alone is just awesome to me. Thanks
     
  2. DIRT

    DIRT TPF Noob!

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    very interesting, I would like to hear more. What book did you read this in?
     
  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I've never heard of developing film in the cassette, or a process that would develop and fix in a single step.

    MQ means the developer contains metol and hydroquinone (metol quinol). Kodak D-76 is a MQ developer. PQ means the developer contains phenidone and hydroquinone (phenidone quinol). Ilford ID11 is a PQ developer. Kodak Xtol contains phenidone and ascorbic acid (instead of hydroquinone).
     
  4. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    They are called monobath developers and people have experimented with them for years though they only became practical in late 60's. Even so they present problems.
    A monobath contains developer and fixer. Development times are determined by the length of time needed to fix the film. The way the thing works results in higher base fog, loss of film speed and an increase in grain and contrast, but modern formulae keep these to a minimum.
    They normally contain phenidone and hydroquinone along with thiosulphate in a high pH. I have a number of formulae.
    Contrast is independent of development time (provided fixation has taken place fully). Contrast has to be controlled by solution temp. High temp = high contrast and vice versa. Agitation contols the rate of fixation - more agitation gives a quicker fix with a consequent loss of speed and contrast.
    Some films also work better than others - you just have to experiment.
    Personally I found monobaths of only limited use and are best kept as curios. Good if you need to dev a film in a hurry though.
    I have also developed a film in the can (using a monobath). You make a swizzle stick for the film reel so you can loosen and tighten the film inside to provide agitation. It is a desperate measure and I wouldn't advise it. I had no choice at the time.
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    That's what I was thinking.
     
  6. jbnhl

    jbnhl TPF Noob!

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    Awesome, Thanks, I'm not 100% sure of the name of the book I was reading although I think it was one of John Hedgecoe's, It may have been something like the "complete book of photography" which doesnt really narrow it down seeing as how there are about 50 books with that same name. But anyway, thats really helpful, I may give it a try.. and since we're unsure of results, ill know not to try it on an important roll.
     
  7. tempra

    tempra TPF Noob!

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    I have hedgecoes "The Photographers Handbook" which alludes to being a complete reference manual of photographic techniques, procedures and equipment.

    Has a bit on monobaths on page 50, if you like, I could scan the page for you.

    I have another one by him somewhere, cost me 5p at a jumble sale.
     
  8. jbnhl

    jbnhl TPF Noob!

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    if its no trouble, that'd be great Tempra, the only thing i could think about when i read it at the store was how much time/resources it would eliminate. I saw a little diagram like Hertz was talking about in the book where you use a stick or dowel type thing and develope it inside the canister, that really caught my attention and i didnt know what to think since i had such a hard time searching online for info on it.
     

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