Opinion on starting gear

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Kingnothing275, Feb 21, 2007.

  1. Kingnothing275

    Kingnothing275 TPF Noob!

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    Okay, I am just breaking into the photography world I've been fascinated by photography for quite a long time and finally decided to take it up, So I recently purchased this gear for $125 CAD;
    1- Canon T70 35mm camera
    1- screw mount to canon mount adapter
    1- 35mm Opticum lens 1:2.8
    1- Vivitar 28-135mm lens 3.5-4.5 MACRO with box
    1- Optex 2x teleconverter with carry case and box
    1- Albinar 80-200mm 1:3.9 MACRO
    1- Hanimex 80-200mm 1:3.5 with case
    1- Samyang 500mm lens with filter set and soft carry bag
    1- Vivitar 28mm 1:2.8 in box
    1- Skylight 1A filter w/case
    1- Optex 55mm UV filter w-case
    1- Image 1A skylight filter w/case
    1- step-up ring 49mm-52mm

    I just want to get an opinion from some more accomplished photographers.

    Do you think this is good equipment to start out on?
    Also, what kinds of film would you recommend for different kinds of shooting?
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Whatever equipment you can start out with is good equipment to start out with.

    That's tautological. It's also true.

    Use and learn your equipment. As you become more proficient, any problems in your particular set of gear will become apparant. You can then decide what, if anything, to do about it.
     
  3. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I agree with Torus34 about the equipment. I started photography with a 35mm body and a 50mm lens and it took me a while before I needed something more. Use what you have at the moment. After a while sell what you don't use and buy what you need instead. Maybe a good addition to your equipment would be a tripod to keep your camera steady (especially if you want to use that 500mm lens)

    As for film, first make a choice between colour and B&W. Assuming you go for colour, you'll have to decide between print film or slide film. Usually, print films are better for beginners as they have more exposure latitude. With slide film, you have to be more accurate with exposure to get good results.

    Film speed (ISO rating) will depend on many factors: amount of light, indoor or outdoor shooting, subject... I cannot recommend films for every type of situations as I almost exclusively shoot landscapes. For this type of pictures a good print film for me is Fuji Reala (ISO 100) but this may not suit your taste. I am afraid you will have to experiment to see what you like. Maybe oi you let us know what type of photography you are interested in, some people can recommend films.
     
  4. Kingnothing275

    Kingnothing275 TPF Noob!

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    I'm really interested, in scenic and landscape photography as well as darker more surreal kind of photography, if my explanations on the second aren't clear enough I could provide an example of the kind of stuff I'm talking about.
     
  5. Aquarium Dreams

    Aquarium Dreams TPF Noob!

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    Could you provide examples? I'm curious what you mean by darker and more surreal...

    If you are shooting mostly landscapes and things that don't move a lot, iso 100 is your best bet, because it's widely available and has a finer grain than faster films, which you presumably won't need if your subject won't be making any sudden moves.

    I second the tripod opinion, especially for the type of photography you're interested in. A tripod makes you focus more on composition and it helps keep everything in your image nice and sharp, by eliminating the dreaded "camera shake."
     

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