Overexposure?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Simonch, Jun 27, 2006.

  1. Simonch

    Simonch TPF Noob!

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    Hey guys!

    ok, so maybe im a bit out of my depth posting in this forum, should have perhaps gone to the beginners section!

    I am using a Panasonic Lumix DMC FZ-5, and when i use a slow shutter, all of my photo's are far too bright, i have tried lowering the iso, and selecting and underexposed setting. was wondering if anyone could shed some light (no pun intented) on the situation and give me some pointers?

    Smashin, thanks a lot :)
     
  2. Reverend

    Reverend TPF Noob!

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    Sort of depends on the shot, but for a longer exposure you'll want to decrease the ISO and increase the aperture. Also, if you can, try to control your environment by decreasing ambient light.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    There are three things on a camera that we use to control exposure. Shutter speed, aperture and sensitivity (ISO setting).

    If you want a longer shutter speed (letting in more light), you will need to compensate by closing the aperture (bigger F number is smaller aperture)...and/or reducing the ISO setting.

    There are limits however. Your ISO will have a lower limit and your aperture will also have it's limits. Once you reach those limits...then any further slowing of the shutter speed will result in overexposed photos.

    The next thing you can do, is to add a filter in front of the lens. For this situation, the usual solution is an ND (neutral density) filter. It will block light, allowing you to use a longer shutter speed without over exposing the image.

    I don't know the details of your camera, but you may be able to attach filters directly to the lens or you might need a special adapter first.
     
  4. bigfatbadger

    bigfatbadger TPF Noob!

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    I seem to remember '?Holly?' having a similar problem to this. You might want to ask her, I think she had the same camera
     
  5. Flash Harry

    Flash Harry TPF Noob!

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    Mike is correct, look no further.
     
  6. Simonch

    Simonch TPF Noob!

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    Fantastic, thanks a lot guys!!
     

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