Panorama Lighting Problem?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by rcfreak339, Jul 18, 2010.

  1. rcfreak339

    rcfreak339 TPF Noob!

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    Hey all! I am new to shooting Panoramas and I have not yet gotten the lighting down pat. I have had some seccessful ones and some that just fail. But this past week I visited a spanish church in Michigan and they were nice enough to accept and have a good meal with them. I thought it would be a nice shot to get the whole group in. The lighting on it thought has just been kicking my butt...I have tried for the past 2 days to fix the problem but just can't. Here are the two pictures...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Is there anything I could do? Or do I just have to scrap it and try again next time? Any help would be great! Thanks!
     
  2. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Set the white balance / color temperature the same in both shots before merging them.

    When planning to shoot a pan, it's best to set that up in camera before pulling the trigger on the multiple shots. If you let the camera decide for each shot, they usually won't match.
     
  3. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

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    you also need to use exactly the same exposure in both shots. You need to either set the exposure manually or lock the exposure through the whole set.
     
  4. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    John's basic 'How-to' guide to Panoramas...

    1. In order to get a good pano, your camera has to be level, and has to rotate around the nodal point. This the point at which the image inverts. For practical purposes, with most lenses, using the sensor plane will work fine. What this means is that you have to shoot from a tripod for best results.

    Therefore, put your camera on your tripod and level it. Even though my tripod legs and head both have levels built-in, I carry a small dollar-store spirit level in my camera bag to make sure everything is as close to level as I can get it.

    2. Once I'm satisfied that everything is level and square and my tripod is locked (except for the rotating axis) where I want it, it's time to work on the exposure. Another important factor is to NEVER SHOOT PANOS IN AUTO! Set your camera to a manual or semi-manual mode (I use full manual, but either shutter or apeture priority will work as well).

    Determine the range of your pano (eg the left and right limits) and then go through and meter the different areas. Find out what the camera is recommending as maximum and minimum exposure, and when you've done this for the full range of the image, then average the settings. Don't change these settings; yes some will likely be slightly under exposed, and some slightly over, but deal with it in post.

    3. Now you're ready to start shooting. I always start at the left-hand end of the intended pano and work right, simply so that the images are in the correct order when they're on my computer, but that's up to you. Expose the first image, and choose a landmark about 2/3 of the way to the right-hand side of the frame. Now, being careful to ensure that you don't upset your level, move your camera so that the left-hand edge of the frame lines up on the land mark you just chose. Ideally you want about a 30-35% (or 1/3) overlap between each image. Continue shooting in this manner until you have the whole sequence captured.

    4. Download and stitch using your favorite software.
    A few tips: With respect to the issue of exposure: If there is an extreme dynamic range within the pano, (say bright sun to deep shade) I will often bracket each image 1/3 stop on each side, so that for every image used in the pano, you actually expose three. This gives you a bit of latitude in terms of trying to produce an image with a pleasing and realistic dynamic range, but be warned, it often looks hokey.

    One of the most important tools you can have for taking panos (aside from a good tripod) are filters. There are two types, one is the circular polarizer (CPOL)for enhancing colours and deepening the blue in sky and the other is graduated neutral density(G-ND); these help to prevent blown skies and preserve detail on the ground. When using a CPOL, it's important to remember not to change it's setting through the course of the pano either. Find the optimum setting and use it at that setting for the whole image. Likewise with your G-ND; don't change their position or intensity.
     
  5. redtippmann

    redtippmann TPF Noob!

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    And if you wanted to do a 360 panorama and light it, sourcemaker has lighting balloons. They float above you so you dont need any lighting stands that could otherwise get in the shot.
     
  6. rcfreak339

    rcfreak339 TPF Noob!

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    I made a big mistake in shooting those in auto, but is there anyway to save these? In Photoshop or any other editor?
     
  7. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    You can try adjusting the images separately in your photo-editor of choice and getting them as close as possile in exposure, brightness, contrast, etc and re-creating the pano.
     
  8. Golden Smith

    Golden Smith TPF Noob!

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    Ace is right use the tripod tool in photoshop....
     
  9. Simons

    Simons TPF Noob!

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    Hows this

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Vautrin

    Vautrin No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Another thing you can do if you have very different exposure across your pano, is to take multiple shots with multiple exposures

    Then merge them together (e.g. with photomatix or photoshop) to ensure an even exposure across the whole pano.

    This might be difficult with people as a subject though since a minute movement could result in a problem stitching. I'm actually amazed you got the thing to stitch, you must have been very fast and your people must have been very still
     
  11. Morpheuss

    Morpheuss TPF Noob!

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    that is awesome how did you stich them together?
     
  12. Simons

    Simons TPF Noob!

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    I think you are all underestimating the POWER of photoshop..

    As long as your taking the shots one after another, and on the same settings, your pretty much going to get fairly similar shots, or similar enough for photoshop to work its magic.

    Simply go to 'File' - 'Automate' - 'Photomerge'

    [​IMG]
    ^Select your images with these settings

    If you didnt use a tripod it will probably look like this:
    [​IMG]

    So just crop it!
    [​IMG]

    Image Source
     

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