Panorama

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Lil Bob, Oct 27, 2008.

  1. Lil Bob

    Lil Bob TPF Noob!

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    How does one go about taking/making a panoramic photo?

    Thanks,

    Bobby
     
  2. AtlPikMan

    AtlPikMan TPF Noob!

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  3. JerryinToronto

    JerryinToronto TPF Noob!

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    The main thing is that the photos have to have a certain amount of overlap. Some cameras, like the Nikon Coolpix, has a feature called PANORAMA ASSIST. What that does is it takes the right half of the previous shot and then you can use it to superimpose it over you current shot. Or yo could just use some sort of feature in the landscape to do this.
    Then you need the correct software do "stitch" then shots togther. I use Panoramic factory, but there ar other out there. Photoshop does it as well.
    J.
     
  4. Lil Bob

    Lil Bob TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the Help... I am using Photoshop cs3 right now i am just not sure where to look to "stitch" it together....
     
  5. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

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    I use my panoramic camera. :mrgreen:

    Ok, ok, enough of the wise cracks.

    I really do use my panoramic camera though. :wink:

    I addition to whats mentioned above, a tripod will help too. The steadier the shot is and the easier / better the pic will come out with software based stitching programs. Some cameras emulate panoramics by basically using only the middle 1/3 across the full width the sensor emulating a panoramic shot (not recording the top and bottom 1/3).

    Oh, and if your like me and get a true panoramic camera. Don't trust Kodak to cut your negatives correctly. They ruined 20 rolls of film right after I first got my camera. Even though I checked the special insturctions box, and clearly put on the envelope (panoramic pictures - do not cut negatives, frame size 57x24mm!!!). :x
     
  6. JerryinToronto

    JerryinToronto TPF Noob!

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    I debated about using a tripod. I just pan the camera along roughly the same axis. If you have good software and used a landscape feature then it's not a problem. I did a pan shot of the Colusuem in Rome and the Louvre in Paris. I will try to upload it later.
     
  7. Lil Bob

    Lil Bob TPF Noob!

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    That would be great thanks.
     
  8. JerryinToronto

    JerryinToronto TPF Noob!

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  9. JerryinToronto

    JerryinToronto TPF Noob!

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    It's not neccesary to have a "true panoramic camera. As long has you're shooting along the same axis, more or less and the exposures are approximately the same, then the software can do it for you. Isn't technology wonderful?
    J.
     
  10. TamiyaGuy

    TamiyaGuy No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Lil Bob, Photoshop CS3 has an automatic panorama mode in it, called "Photomerge" (in File, not Image). From there it's really easy. You can perform tweaks yourself, have Photoshop make it into a spherical photo, or just do everything automatically. I haven't had any problems with Auto yet, so I just use that.

    As for taking the photos, I generally use Manual shooting mode. From using Auto or Aperture Priority, figure out the average exposure you need for the scene, then constantly use that exposure. Then pop the camera on a tripod, set it up vertically (this helps minimize barrel distortion, plus it makes your images 50% higher resolution), and take your photos, leaving a 33-50% overlap in between each one.

    As JerryInToronto said, these things are not absolutely necessary. However, every little helps, and I find it much more reassuring that I did absolutely everything to the letter (apart from use a panoramic tripod head, but I agree with Jerry there in that you need one of those very rarely nowadays).
     
  11. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

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    Oh, I know, I was being somewhat a smart allec about the pano camera remarks. I am still mad about Kodak ruining all that film though. :grumpy: And that was from years ago.

    I happen to have a segmented tripod head that I use when taking pano pictures with my D20. My computer is about 4 years old and it really seems to help in speed when the pictures are closer to lining up. I have never really timed it. Just seems quicker when stitching. PS2 user
     
  12. Lil Bob

    Lil Bob TPF Noob!

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    Ok.. I'll give it a try. thanks a lot guys and i might post up the pictures i take. Thanks again..

    Bobby
     

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