PD Prism?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Dave_D, Jan 6, 2006.

  1. Dave_D

    Dave_D TPF Noob!

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    I'm in the market for a metered prism finder for my RB67. I have seen PD prisms used for around 300 US. It offers averaged and spot metering as opposed to the CDS prism which is only center weighted and runs about half as much. Has anyone used the PD and is it worth spending twice as much for it?
     
  2. Dave_D

    Dave_D TPF Noob!

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    I suppose it's safe to assume that medium and large format is not exactly par for the course of this forum.
     
  3. Krim

    Krim TPF Noob!

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    Hello, I use an RZ with a PD prism, i picked it up about 3 yrs ago for £200, so about 350ish US, and i got quite a good deal at the time, though i did buy it in the uk and everything costs a bit more here. However, i have never actually used its internal meter, always use a handheld sekonic. if you're want use the prism meter i'd go for the more expensive one, especially if you're shooting on tranny film.
    I would definatley recommend a Prism, i couldn't work without one i'm so used to it.

    Garden State? is that HW?

    Simon

    :mrgreen:
     
  4. Dave_D

    Dave_D TPF Noob!

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    Krim, I'm so glad you responded to my question as I was about to give up all hope for this forum. Not many left out there still using MF. Currently I use a Gossen luna pro digi f, but the only problem with it is the light where I am vs. the lighting of a scene I'm shooting is not always the same. Since I do use tranny I don't have much latitude and I end up going through more film then I'd like to make sure I've covered the exposure range. It is more of a detriment when I'm shooting LF. Considering that the PD offers more than one option, I think it will be the way to go. Thanks for your input.
     
  5. Krim

    Krim TPF Noob!

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    If I were you i would get meter with a good spot meter in it, friend mine does lots of 5x4 landscape work on tranny, he uses a Sekonic spot meter

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/con...423&is=REG&addedTroughType=categoryNavigation

    which agreed is not cheap, but gets very acurate readings. I think he takes readings from darker and lighter ares within the shot and has a way of working out what exposure to use.

    (not familiar with gossen meters so ignore this if it already has a spot)

    Krim

    :wink:
     
  6. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Come on now, there's still quite a few of us film buffs here!!!

    The trouble is that we're a varied bunch and there's people out there with everything from Zeiss and Yashica right up to Speed Graphics via Hassleblads, Bronicas and Mamiyas. However there's probably only a couple of people who are that experienced with the RB67 and it's prisms.

    I just use a separate meter for everything - I love waist level finders!

    Rob
     
  7. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    I was going to say the same. I personally don't see many RB's or RZ's outside the studio. I love MF, but was using a Yashica-mat, Holga, and Koni-Omega Rapid. And yeah, I started using a separate meter when I got my first MF.

    But you are right. It is less common here, and LF even less so. But that's the case in the general population.
     
  8. Dave_D

    Dave_D TPF Noob!

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    I have a pretty well rounded Bronica ETR system, but I love the 6x7 size. I read an article by a landscape photog who uses an RZ exclusively and was surprised. Like yourself, I've only seen them in studios. An occassional wedding photog here and there, but never as a field piece. I decided to try the RB for Lscapes and was blown away. The 2 Nikon F4s' don't get out much anymore. I almost feel guilty about it. I do use them to shoot a proof (so to speak) of a scene when I take out the LF and also for metering purposes. I've looked into spotmeters and the zone system however, I'm trying to avoid turning the "experience" of capturing the scene becoming an excersize in mathematics. The Nikon is nice for a meter as it will do spot, center weighted and matrix and as far as I can tell, just a plain spotmeter can't compare. I do like the idea of having a metered finder with ttl on the RB so it becomes a self contained system.
     
  9. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    Yeah, having a meter in-camera is great. At least you know it's metering the same composition as the film will be seeing. I went with a hand-held (but not a spot) because the Yashica-Mat meter is rather crappy.

    I'd heard people say that they don't use an RB/RZ because they don't want to lug it around, but that's nothing compared to a 4x5.

    While we're speaking LF, here's a link to a friend of mine. He uses 4x5 for architectural shots. Usually very long exposures. Sometimes as much as 10 minutes. I love his work.
    http://www.scotthendershot.com/
     
  10. Dave_D

    Dave_D TPF Noob!

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    Mark, Your friend has a nice folio. No grain and what you see on the net is only about a quarter of the true detail of the actual image. It's definitely aw-inspiring.
     
  11. Krim

    Krim TPF Noob!

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    I use my RZ everywhere, only in studio's maybe 5% of the time, and i never use a tripod either - find them so restricting, occasionally a monopod if using a slow shutter. Agreed its a heavy bastard but it is doable to use them handheld, i use a power winder and an L-grip to spread the weight and make things a bit easier.

    However, i am trading it all in for a d200 & a handful of fixed-prime lenses in the next coulpa weeks, but its easy to hire an RZ in London so i'm sure i'll keep using it now and again.

    Krim

    :wink:
     
  12. Dave_D

    Dave_D TPF Noob!

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    You traitor! just kidding:D But my GOD! You must have arms like schwarzenegger by now!
     

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