Peanut [Or His Eye] & His Story

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by CowboysDaughter, Jun 30, 2008.

  1. CowboysDaughter

    CowboysDaughter TPF Noob!

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    Peanut is one of the many saddle horses we have on the ranch, but hasn't been ridden in a year. He is a bay Quarter Horse gelding, approximately 8 or 9 years old. He got tangled in a barbed wire fence and was down with no means to stand; we had to cut him out. He was down for anywhere from 12-24 hours and the only physical damage was a cut on his off hidn leg (which is now infected poor fella). But being down the long does seriously traumatizes a horse. The first picture was taken before the meds kicked in. (He has recently been dosed with Bute, Banamine, Dexamethazone, and Penicillin, not to mention Proud Flesh applied to the wound, basically Nitro-Furizone with steroids.) I think you can really see it in his eyes, just how scared he was and all; his flanks trembled with each breath. The second, after the Bute kicked in and I had groomed out his mane and tail (which looked like they hadn't been groomed in years). His eye is much brighter here. I tried to get some good full body pics, but he bonded with me, being alone in the pens and scared like that, and kept following me. :lovey: He also would hardly stay still, so forgive me for a not-so-attractive background, these were the best shots I could get. I do wish there was a bit more depth of field paticularly in the second pic.

    Peanut was never really given a chance to learn or understand a human, just like every other horse on this ranch was condemned to 'obey' a human, and not given a chance to understand. The reason I've written this much, is I believe the story behind the picture truly makes a difference.

    I may be the only one here who thinks so, but I honestly believe these pictures portray a horse's pure heart that reflect though his eyes; trust, loyalty and innocence.

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  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The story makes the images.
     
  3. Senor Hound

    Senor Hound TPF Noob!

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    I want to see more of this beautiful horse! I want to see his whole head and body, and also more photos! :)

    Your shots are great. The story is very good, but only because it has a happy ending. :) I'm glad Mr. Peanut is recovering, and I hope his cut gets better.

    People don't realize how fragile horses are. They fall down, and that's a HUGE deal. They break a bone, and its usually a death sentence. I think stories like this help people understand the frailty of such an otherwise powerful animal.
     
  4. Corry

    Corry Flirtacious and Bodacious Supporting Member

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    The first one is great! I like your composition. I, too, want to see more pics!
     
  5. CowboysDaughter

    CowboysDaughter TPF Noob!

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    tirediron: Thank you, I really agree. Many photos have such sentimental values, and without knowing the feeling, the story, behind the shot, it may mean nothing to others.

    SenorHound: Haha I will go out and try to get a few more, at your request. =) Perhaps this evening even. Yes horses are fragile, but their mind even more so than their bodies. There are alot of fragile minded horses and alot of really dud-minded horses, both which need to be handled completely differently.

    Corry: Thanks for the compliment! Yes when I went to crop these I really wanted to elongate them for that purpose. As I promised, more attempts at pictures of Peanut very soon!
     

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