Perseid Meteor Shower

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by JayJay65, Aug 11, 2007.

  1. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    http://www.earthsky.org/radioshows/51468/the-2007-peak-of-the-perseid-meteor-showe

    Perseid Meteor Shower is supposed to occur at August 12/13th (12am) from what I know.. Im really nervous, its my first meteor shower (seeing)..

    Couple of questions..

    1) Were will this be viewable? (north, south, ect)
    2) 16 sec shutter, f4, 80 ISO.. are these good settings?
    3) Will the meteors be coming and going to the same place, or scattered?
    4) How long will it be viewable?
    5) What time will it be viewable? (from what i know, its 11pm-12am eastern TZ)

    Any info is nice, thanks guys, if i sound weird its cause im mega nervous :)

    -Jess
     
  2. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    " December 14 and August 12 (the peak mornings of the Geminids and Perseids) will still produce more activity with moonlight than all the others without. They should not be missed regardless of the conditions. "

    - http://www.amsmeteors.org/visual.html
     
  3. Jeff Colburn

    Jeff Colburn TPF Noob!

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    1 - It will start in the low northeast and slowly rise as the night progresses.
    2 - If you just shooting the sky, keep the shutter open until you have enough meteors to make you happy, then move to the next image. Anything over a couple of minutes will show the stars moving though.
    3 - They will come from the same area of the sky and moving in roughly the same direction.

    From http://www.space.com/spacewatch/040806_perseid_guide.html
    The Perseids are also an excellent meteor display to attempt to photograph. Meteor photography is popular and can be carried out with practically any camera. However, the chance of recording a meteor is enhanced by using a fast lens (f 2.8 or better) and ultrafast film (ISO 400 to 1600). It makes no difference whether the camera is clock-driven or fixed on a tripod.

    In a dark sky, exposures of 10 to 20 minutes long can be made, but should be kept much shorter if background light threatens to fog the film. Slight moonlight, twilight or city glow can be tolerated, as they have little to do with the efficiency of a particular lens-film combination in recording bright meteors.

    A successful photograph has many added values if an observer has witnessed and described the same meteor. Also, the chance of obtaining a good meteor picture can be increased by pointing the camera well away from the radiant.

    Have Fun,
    Jeff
     
  4. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    Yeah I read that.. but the thing is, from my knowledge, it varies from the time.. that article talks about 2004...
     
  5. astrostu

    astrostu Guest

    They will all appear to come from the constellation Perseus, hence the name. The show will begin for you around 9:00-10:00 PM LOCAL TIME because that's when the constellation will rise.

    I can't find any information on when the real peak is other than the night of August 12/13. It doesn't sound like it's going to be a spectacular show, perhaps a few dozen per hour (one every few minutes?). But meteor showers are notoriously difficult to predict.

    Check out http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2007/11jul_greatperseids.htm for some more information.

    Edit: I've found significantly more information on photography suggestions: http://luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/meteor.shtml . So have your lens wide open 'cept stopped down one or two stops. If this gets you to anything smaler than an f/3 or so, use ISO 100-200. Otherwise go to a higher ISO. It reads as though the article was written for older cameras (written in 2001) so the noise properties of newer cameras should be better and you should be able to take longer exposures than it says. But that's just my guess from what I know of astrophotography.
     
  6. Miaow

    Miaow TPF Noob!

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  7. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    My first meteor I saw, it was VERY bright.. and it was fast, it stayed in the air for about 1/2 - 1 sec.. omg it was beautiful!!
     
  8. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Photographing meteors. This is guess work at it's finest. I've seen professionals setup at local mountains for hours and then go home angry that they brought their cameras in the first place. That said if you can get the settings and timing right then the results sometimes look great.
     
  9. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    Any tips.. Earthgrazers.. what are these? I read that they are slow and very colorful and pretty "among the prettiest".. are there alot of them or just a few or one??

    Also, when taking pictures, do I focus on one spot or what?

    (I was out there from 11pm-2am)
     
  10. neea

    neea TPF Noob!

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    Oh I'm excited.
    I've never seen a meteor shower before.
     
  11. aMac

    aMac TPF Noob!

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    Well being a few hours ahead, I've already had the event here. I hadn't real done star-gazing photographs before so from my experimenting, I ended up finding ISO 400 and a 30s exposure worked best (and aperture at around f4) because longer exposures on bulb were making the stars themselves streak too much for my liking. Also you need the higher sensitivity because the meteors themselves only appear for 1-2 seconds, and most of that time is spent fading out.

    After all that, I only managed to get one good, clear meteor on camera in the end anyway. I had a few very faint streaks captured but nothing exciting. It's pure guesswork as far as where to point after all (well, after knowing they come from roughly East anyway)!

    [​IMG]
     
  12. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    Thats gorgous.. any tips for me?
     

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