Photographing Interiors

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by wastlinger, Jun 28, 2006.

  1. wastlinger

    wastlinger TPF Noob!

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    I would like to be able to create wide-angle photos of interiors.

    Currently I can achieve the following width of picture: http://www.calice.net/room2.jpg

    I would like to be able to create a picture as follows: http://www.calice.net/room1.jpg

    I own a Canon Powershot A75, and used a wide angle Merkury Optics Super Wide 0.45X lens to create the 1st of the above pictures.

    What do I need to create a picture similar to the second of the above pictures? Do I need a new Camera, or can I buy a wide angle lens for my Canon A75?


    Thanks in advance for any help/advice.

    Wastlinger
     
  2. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    The Canon Powershot A75 is a point and shoot, and doesn't allow interchangeable lenses. There may be a wide angle adapter, which allows some sort of wide angle converter lens to put attached, but I don't know. What is your desired output for the files? Are you making prints, or just viewing on a computer?
     
  3. wastlinger

    wastlinger TPF Noob!

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    The Canon A75 together with an adaptor and a 0.45x lens allows me to take the picture on the following link:
    http://www.calice.net/room2.jpg

    I think the A75 is a 52 mm camera and the wide angle lens I am using is 0.45x, therefore giving me around 24mm focal length (am I making sense?)

    This picture:
    http://www.calice.net/room1.jpg
    was taken by esate agent professionals from the same spot as my effort shown above. Notice that this can capture more of the room. This is what I want to achieve.

    My guess estate agent uses a ultra wide angle lens, which has 14 to 21mm focal length.

    Do I need to buy new equipment to achieve this?

    My desired output is for viewing on computer + also printing to normal size photo.
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Yes, what you need is a wide angle lens. I'm not sure what you mean by normal size photo, but if you want to make nice 8x10s for example, you'll probably want to get an SLR and a wide angle lens. Your cheapest route is a film SLR and a 28mm lens or wider. Since you want to view them on a computer, you'll probably want a digital SLR, but it's not going to be cheap.
     
  5. Philip Weir

    Philip Weir TPF Noob!

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    G'day "wastlinger" and to you "Digital Matt" To give you an example, I have attached two recent images, both on wide-angle. The first on a 12mm lens, the second on a 10.5 lens. The 10.5 obviously distorts, but gives a much bettr feeling of what he room is like. They were shot with bounce flash. Nothing tells the story like an image.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. skiboarder72

    skiboarder72 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Like matt said, if you want cheap wide angle you are going to want to go film because there is no crop factor to take away alot of your wide angle. A good wideangle lense for a DSLR is going to run at least 500, where you could get a film slr camera and a wide angle lense for that.
     
  7. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    While a digital SLR can be at a disadvantage, that's less the case now that they have lenses specifically for them. When they all used film lenses, the crop factor combined with film lenses was a problem. On non-SLR cameras, the lenses can be made much smaller and specific to the camera. This gives a lot more leeway and you will see focal lengths that better match the sensor size. The new kit lenses are made for the digital SLRs, so they are much wider that what came with film cameras and better match the sensor also. Still, for very wide shots, it's probably cheapest to get a film camera and an older ultra-wide.
     
  8. Soocom1

    Soocom1 TPF Noob!

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    Photographing interiors is much like photographing exteriors, except that you have the light to deal with. The problem you will run into is the lens you are and want to use.
    Most interior photography is typically shot with Medium and Large format cameras.
    They are typically shot with specialized lenses for just that purpose. Typically around a 90-150 wide angle. (Large and Med. format).
    If you want to shoot film, you can have a decent set up for around $400. Digital backs for such critters are in the several thousands range. Even a used med. format back can run well over $4000. Large format digital backs are between $4000 for an old used unit to as much as $100,000 new.

    In regards to making the photos look really good with out adding studio flashes, you will defiantly need a series of filters. 81A, 82A etc, will cut out the yellow cast brought out by tungsten lighting. A magenta filter is needed for florescent light that casts a green hue.

    If you shoot film, you can purchase tungsten balanced film.

    There are several lenses in 35mm that will work as well, most particularly with PC or (perspective Control) lenses. Also known as Tilt/Shift. OEM Nikon or Canon PC lenses can run around $800-4000.

    So now that I thoroughly sacred you, consider this: If you go 35mm you still have numerous choices. These people make and sell PC lenses for 35mm. I have one for my Minolta, and it works quite well. http://www.hartblei.com/products/lenses/index.htm

    Thy typically run around $350 on ebay and are well worth it.

    If you stick with your camera, get a filter adapter for what ever lens and get an 81A etc, or watch the white balance on the camera. This will help reduce and can eliminate the various color casts. As for the wide angle aspect with the distortion, this can help if the camera is a digital, or if the image is scanned in: http://www.ephotozine.com/techniques/viewtechnique.cfm?recid=220

    There is much more on this subject, and this may also help:

    http://www.cameratown.com/guides/tutorial_listing.cfm/hurl/id%7C311
     
  9. wastlinger

    wastlinger TPF Noob!

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    I just wanted to thank you all for your help and advice. It will take me some time to digest the information you very kindly provided. Thanks again to you all.
     

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