Photographing Skies

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by meg27, Aug 22, 2005.

  1. meg27

    meg27 TPF Noob!

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    Hi, I am a real ammeter, but am really passionate about photography and want to learn more. I have a Pentax 5n-z SLR that I have had since April, and the results have been great. I'm really interested in photographing the sky, or landscapes with vast sky-scapes. I wondered if any one had any tips for this kind of photography? I want to experiment with filters and stuff, but haven't a clue about them! Also, although most of the shots I want to take would not have the sun in them, as I like moody sky shots, but how would you suggest taking pictures that have either sun-sets, or really bright areas of light coming through clouds?

    Thanks for you help!
    Meg
     
  2. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    Polarizers are lense filters that block a lot of light and for much better colors, particularly make skies much more blue. Also check out ND filters which might help blocking out some of the harsher sunlight. If you are shooting film, tyring getting Kodak Ultra-color or Fuji Velvia at slow speeds around 50 or 100 and use tripod for longer exposures and a higher quality. The film types I recommened are known for higher saturation color
     
  3. Meysha

    Meysha still being picky Vicky

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    If you're going to be shooting with slide film (like the Velvia) make sure you bracket your shots. Slide film is difficult to get the right exposure - especially in trying, high contrast situations like sunsets and bright clouds with the 'dark' blue sky. So if you take a shot, also take one slightly under exposed and over exposed.

    Also, this might sound really stupid, but be careful of your composition. Have a look at other landscape photographs that you like and look at where they put the horizon or the clouds or the other 'feature' in the photo and you'll start to see trends of what you like the look of.
     
  4. ang

    ang TPF Noob!

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    Just to piggy back onto Meg's thread . . . any tricks to exposing for photographs of skies???
     
  5. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    Like Meysha said, bracket the shots. After a while you find what you like. I do a light meter reading, and bracket down 2 stops in full stops. Just find what suits you best.
     
  6. meg27

    meg27 TPF Noob!

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    thankyou everyone, and Darin, i took a look at your photo's that sky picture is amazing!!! Thats exactly the kind of thing that inspires me to do this! I want to do that!!!!!! Did you really take that?
     
  7. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks! I went two full stops down from what the meter reading was and when I printed it in my darkroom I added a higer contrast filter and went for a long exposure, but the same thing can be done with a scan in photoshop by adjusting the levels and contrast.
     
  8. sandratycova

    sandratycova TPF Noob!

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    Hi meg
    It is good that you are interested in photography the sky, or landscapes with vast sky-scapes. A skyscape means one places the horizon at the very bottom of the image .this helps to ground the viewer and put the sky in context by showing that the sky dominates a vast space in the an open area.I usually work with a 24-80 mm zoom for in camera cropping larger skyscapes or an 80-200 mm zoom for specific cloud images. I try to use a polarizing filter as it darkens the sky and enhances the color saturation.
     

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