Photos of falling snow

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Meysha, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. Meysha

    Meysha still being picky Vicky

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    Messages:
    4,152
    Likes Received:
    58
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Well inspired by another thread I'm going to try and get some better shots of falling snow.

    But how?! I've only so far tried during the day time and I always end up with fine white streaks. I didn't try turning the shutter speed down last time (ran out of time, and got cold). But apart from this, what else should I do? Is night time better/easier?

    Now I really can't wait until it snows again!
     
  2. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Messages:
    8,115
    Likes Received:
    64
    You need a fast shutter to freeze them and not have streaks. Big snow flakes help a lot to.
    For the night shot he used a flash to freeze them in the air.
     
  3. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    5,346
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Use a flash even in the daytime.
     
  4. friendlyphoto

    friendlyphoto TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would like to do some snow flakes myself, but I am more concern about the camera getting wet when taking the shot. Do you or should you put it in a plastic bag (zip lock type).

    Thanks
     
  5. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    5,346
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The camera won't get wet from snow, because snow is not wet, until it warms up :p

    If it's snowing super heavy, you might want to cover it up with something, but light fluffy snowflakes can just be brushed off.

    Just make sure there's no snow on it when you go back inside. It also helps to put the entire camera in a plastic bag and seal it up before you bring it back in, to preven any moisture inside from condensing on the lens and other parts.
     
  6. friendlyphoto

    friendlyphoto TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    "The camera won't get wet from snow, because snow is not wet, until it warms up :p"

    Some how, I see that one coming.... :D

    Actaully come to think of it that part is true. But how do you avoid snow sticking to the lense? I have a lense hood, does that helps??

    I tried taking snow flakes using flash yesterday, but the few snow in the front gets very bright and the pictures didnt look good. But I didnt use a lense hood.

    Thanks
     
  7. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    5,346
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Yes, use a lens hood, but becareful, because it might get in the way of your flash.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

falling snow printable picture