Please Help: lighting fashion-type shots using fluorescent lights

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ChrisOquist, Oct 17, 2008.

  1. ChrisOquist

    ChrisOquist TPF Noob!

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    Tomorrow I will be shooting promotional images for a female vocalist, and we will be shooting at a number of different locations. I don't have any studio gear and the only flash I have is the pop-up from my Rebel XT, which is why I usually shoot everything using available light. Tomorrow I will probably have access to two Bowens Tri-Lite fluorescent lights - I could rent other equipment but don't have a budget for the shoot so I would prefer to stay with what I have unless it's completely inadequate.

    I'm going for a dramatic, fashion-styled feel for most of these, and two of the scenes we are shooting in particular will require dramatic lighting. The first will be shot at an old Victorian Museum I got special permission to shoot a few scenes in. This is the look I'm going for, as well as a few shots of the location.

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    The second will be her, dressed in a very elegant cocktail dress and makeup, wrapped up in white sheets on a messy bed, shot from directly above. I particularly want to use light to highlight the texture of the sheets as in some of the photos below.

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    Do you guys have any advice on the placement of these two lights, and any tips in using fluorescent lighting for this kind of shoot in general? If these lights are ABSOLUTELY inadequate I can consider renting something else, but I would much rather go with what I've got (I've seen a lot of photographers do more with less). Also, if you do recommend different lighting:

    - The furniture, wallpaper, curtains, etc at the museum are very old and I want to minimize heat so I think Tungsten is out.
    - I don't have experience with strobes and clearly don't have the time to learn before the shoot tomorrow. Because continuous lighting allows me to see the effects of the light as I am setting up the shots I think this is the best way to go given my experience.

    I really appreciate your thoughts!
     
  2. ChrisOquist

    ChrisOquist TPF Noob!

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    Hmm..

    The two Bowens lights fell through. So I am going to go rent a Wescott Spiderlight, which looks like it might be pretty sweet but I will only have one..
     
  3. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Tomorrow is kind of soon. See if you can find a couple of Plexiglas mirrors. You are going to need to rake across you model with the light for the bed shots to accentuate the wrinkled sheets and you'll need fairly hard light. If you can't find the mirrors foil and cardboard is the standby.

    A boom would be handy too.

    Start reading strobist.com now.
     

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