Polarising filter on an overcast day

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by MANDS, Nov 7, 2004.

  1. MANDS

    MANDS TPF Noob!

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    This week-end, I went to photograph the New Forest ponies (& pig) that roam free in Hampshire
    It was an overcast day and I had a polarising filter on my lens. I looked this up in one of my books and apparently the pics should come out OK (I haven't sent them in yet). Are there any major problems doing this? Would a warming filter have been a better idea?
     
  2. Artemis

    Artemis Just Punked Himself

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    Yeah a warm up filter would have been usefull, but having a polariser certainly wont make your pictures worse, just may not make a hell of alot of difference....
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    A Polarizing filter may cut down on haze or glare but it won't ruin your photos.

    They do block about one stop of light so I usually take it off when it's overcast.
     
  4. Jamie R

    Jamie R TPF Noob!

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    Certain film respond differently to polarising filters.

    The most common effects of polarisers are:

    1. Increase saturation
    2. Reduce glare and reflection at an angle
    3. Increase contrast
    4. Colour shift & possible distortion of hues
    5. Reduce light transmission by up to 2 stops

    I guess you wanted 1). & 3). This comes at a pros & cons scenario. For enthusiast photographers, the effects of a polariser can be pleasing enough. Some film respond terribly to polarisers i.e. Fuji Velvia and Kodak H100G. Print film can do better if the machine operator doesn't neutralise all of your filtration effects.

    Water/rain will become black and you may lose detail. The trend for hypersaturated (garish) images is on the wane although by all means develop the results and see if you like them.

    Best wishes.
     
  5. MANDS

    MANDS TPF Noob!

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    Thanx for your advice guys. I only joined up yesterday and have picked up a heck of a lot already. One day with a lot of dedication & the good advice I get on this forum, perhaps I'll be able to take horse photos as well as Robert VAVRA. (In my dreams!)
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    It depends on the subject matter, but particularly if I'm shooting foliage I'll use a polarizer on an overcast day. The effect is sort of subtle when looking through the viewfinder, but there is still a lot of glare on many subjects on an overcast day.
     

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