Polarizer suggestions

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Photog38, Mar 13, 2008.

  1. Photog38

    Photog38 TPF Noob!

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    I would like to get a circular polarizer, but I'm not sure which one. I don't want a cheap one, but I don't want to spent too much more than $100 either. Also, I'm not sure what size to get. If I get a 67mm for my current lens, and then in the future I get a larger lens, I'd have to get another polarizer to fit that lens. Should I get a larger filter (like 77mm) and use step-up rings? This would cost more, but I would probably be able to use the same filter for almost any lens I would ever own. Any suggestions?:confused:
     
  2. CanadianMe

    CanadianMe TPF Noob!

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    I have one for every lens I own. Get one for the lens you currently own and worry about a larger one when you upgrade your lens. Mine were more than a $100 each but if I am willing to buy a good lens and as others have said why put a cheap piece of glass over such an expensive lens. And if you don't know what lens you are going to buy it is sort of hit and miss with buying a larger one and you may end up having to buy one for your new lens anyway. Work with your current lens and worry about the next lens polarizer when you get the next lens.
     
  3. ChrisP

    ChrisP TPF Noob!

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    I agree with CanadianMe - if you spend big $$ on your lens, don't settle for cheaper filter. One word of advice I've heard is to get multi-coated polarizers - typically better optical quality. I just picked up a B+W multi-coated circular polarizer for my 18-200VR lens and I'm amazed by the build and optical quality of this lens. Now, it was a little more than your figure (I think it was in the $125 range), but excellent filter. Remember that you can always buy a filter that fits your largest lens and buy step-up rings to step down to your smaller diameter lens.
     
  4. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    Yeah, what he said and...
    using a step-up ring will prevent you from using a hood.
     
  5. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    I went even further. I bought the same lens and got a Hoya "Pro-1" polarizer for US$172.50!

    By the way, my first two week of experimenting shows that the lens is well worth the price. I'll get a bit more serious tomorrow.
     
  6. Photog38

    Photog38 TPF Noob!

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    What brands are good? I'm guessing Hoya and B+W are pretty good. Multi-coated is best, right?
     
  7. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    Hoya is excellent. Their top of the line is the "Pro-1" series. I've been told that B+W is also excellent but I can't speak from experience.

    Multicoated is not the "best" way to go - it's the only way to go. Without multicoating, you're inviting flare and lots of it. If you can't afford a multicoated filter, you can't afford a filter.
     
  8. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    I also have the HOYA PRO1 Polarizer, and it is excellent quality. My only nit, more like MAJOR annoyance, is that the thread ring is so freakin' thin, once I get the polarizer on the lens, I can't grip it to get the bastard back off. :x

    I had to go out and pick up a filter wrench, which, albiet small & lightweight, is just another thing that has to go in the bag.

    Luckily, both of my lenses are 77mm, so only one filter needed in the bag....
     
  9. Dubious Drewski

    Dubious Drewski TPF Noob!

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    I personally went as far as to buy 2 stepup rings that go to my biggest lens' filter diameter. Now all of my lenses can be stepped up to one single size. So If I need to buy any filter, I just buy one filter at one size, albeit a bigger size. :)

    EDIT: and if you're buying from Ebay, resist the urge to buy one of those crazy-cheap filters from China. They're awful! They don't even thread properly, nevermind their image quality.
     
  10. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I can. :thumbsup:
     
  11. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The best polarizing filters are Kaeseman Circular Polarizers. They are also not cheap. That is why I own a single 77mm filter and use step up rings. When using a polarizing filter I don't worry about a hood. My hand, hat, or white balance target held above the lens if necessary accomplishes the same thing for cutting out any direct sunlight on the filter.

    This was my personal choice as it in constructed with brass rather than aluminum. I have never had a brass fitted filter get stuck on a lens.
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ..._707743_77mm_Kaeseman_Circular_Polarizer.html

    B&W also makes a fine filter:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/95042-REG/B_W_65016520_77_mm_Kaeseman_Circular.html

    At these prices I am definately not buying one for each lens.
     
  12. Tiberius47

    Tiberius47 TPF Noob!

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    Just remember, if you are buying a polariser make sure it is a circular polariser. Linear polarisers don't work too well with autofocus lenses...
     

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