Polarizers?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by sween, Jul 3, 2009.

  1. sween

    sween TPF Noob!

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    Driving to a mall today, my wife handed me a pair of old sunglasses. I'd forgotten mine and am clueless where these came from, but they had to have been purchased at least ten years.

    To my near astonishment, this pair of sunglasses had polarized lenses, cheap as they were, which just punched up some of the cloud formations today enormously. In fact, some of the clouds were nothing short of spectacular, made especially so by the glasses.

    Soooooooo, I got to wondering, and do not know the answer, about CPs for dSLRS. Do they make any sense? Does anyone here use a CP on their dSLR? If so, what brand and model?

    Any input greatly appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I do.
    Most landscape photographers have one handy.

    Hoya (not their cheap ones), B+W, Schneider ...
     
  3. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    CPLs make just as much sense for a DSLR as any other camera. It's an effect that can not be duplicated in software and must me done in optically.

    If you buy only one filter ever I recommend it's a good quality polariser like a Hoya SHMC CPL or a Kenko KMC CPL on your wide angle lens.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Polarizers are one of the 'best' filters...especially for DSLR cameras. Primarily because a polarizer is one of the only filters that can't be easily replicated with digital editing. It's essentially the only filter I ever use anymore on a regular basis.

    And yes, polarized sunglasses are great. You can probably replicate the effect of rotating a circular polarizing filter by rotating your head. I do that all the time while driving around, just to see the effect it has on the sky/clouds.

    Just don't try to shoot with a CPL filter and the sunglasses on....it doesn't work. :lol:
     
  5. 03civicdx

    03civicdx TPF Noob!

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    i never leave home with out one.
     
  6. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    I was in Alaska a few weeks ago and had that once-in-a-lifetime (read that as outrageously expensive) opportunity to land on the Ruth Glacier next to Mt. McKinley in a small plane (Cessna 185). Imagine my horror as I looked through the viewfinder only to see all sorts of bizarre colors on the image. I was sure the windows on the plane were messed up. Then I realized that I was wearing polarizing sunglasses and I had my CP on the lens. I took the glasses off and all was well with the world and I got some great shots. The CP really added impact to some of them (as well as taking a few hours off my life until I figured out what was wrong).
     
  7. Arkanjel Imaging

    Arkanjel Imaging No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    x2

    I use a polarizer just about anywhere I have the f stop range to. Makes for much richer colors.
     
  8. Canosonic

    Canosonic TPF Noob!

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    Here is the same scene with and without Pol effects:
    Without
    [​IMG]

    With:
    [​IMG]


    I made these to prove to my friends that this 50-dollar-piece-of-glace is worth it!
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2009
  9. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

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    Polarized sunglasses have been around for a long time. One of the original uses were for fishermen so they can reduce the glare on water and see below the surface.

    CPL's for cameras do the same. They do more than just help with darkening sky. They help control reflections off objects and water. I also agree on having a good CPL. I have a B+W for my main lenses and a couple off brand ones. And there is a difference.
     
  10. sween

    sween TPF Noob!

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    Hey, thanks for all the input on CPLs. You've pretty much convinced me I need to have one for my dSLR. I have two already, but neither will fit my 72mm needs. Soooooooo, it's time to buy.

    Can we talk brand and model, please. I am well aware of all the arguments against putting cheap glass in front of expensive glass, and do believe that doing so makes no sense at all, but I also don't want to spend somewhere around $200(US), when a Tiffen or Hoya in the $35-40 range will suit my needs. Whatever CPL I buy won't be on my camera all the time, and it won't take a beating.

    Any help appreciated here. Thanks...
     
  11. Arkanjel Imaging

    Arkanjel Imaging No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Personally I wont use crappy filters. A great lens is only as good as the filter in front of it. CPL's arent cheap but the better ones are definitely worth the $$.
     
  12. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

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    For filters its a good idea to buy good ones. As a bad piece of glass or plastic in some cases will make your lens a bad lens.

    Also the better polarizers have multicoatings. This is important as it helps prevent / cut down on lens flare and stray light reflections bouncing around between the filter glass and lens glass.

    Hoya and B+W make very good filters that are multicoated. One thing you can do is buy a filter that fits your largest lens say 77mm (just an example). And buy reducers for it to fit your smaller lenses (62-77, 58-77, etc..). The reducers are only about $15. This way you can buy a very good filter, and still use it on all your other lenses without spending a fortune.

    Also there is a difference in the cheap filters and good ones. I have a B+W filter for my larger lenses 77mm. As I started to use more than one body and my wife started to take pics. I picked up some other polarizers at local photo shops. These were all private label brand filters (some were highly touted to be very good for the price). But after comparing them to the B+W there is a noticeable difference. I have several reducers and can use the 77mm on any of my lenses as I suggested above. We still use a couple of the cheaper CPL's, but when we really want to try and make a good shot, we will put the B+W on.
     

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