Polarizing filter questions

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by joyride, Feb 24, 2006.

  1. joyride

    joyride TPF Noob!

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    I was thinking of getting a polarized filter for my D50. I knwo that the way you orient it matter, however, I dont know which way it should go? horizontal or perpendicular? Also, I understand that there are a lot of situations to use it for reduced glare and such, but is there any reason to remove it? How many of you guys actually use one? As you can tell, I really dont knwo if I should get it or not, but it seems like a cheap enough thing to have.
     
  2. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    You should definetly get it. It will be the most essential filter you own. Don't worry about how to orient it. You get the most polarization when you are 90 degrees from the sun, and you just rotate the filter, clockwise or counter, and you'll see the effects through the lens. It's a no brainer, but a must have! Get the largest size you can afford, because then you can use it on any and all lenses you own with stepup rings.

    edit: About when to use it, and if you should remove it. You won't need it on if you are shooting indoors really, unless you are trying to shoot through glass. I would only use it in sunny situations, and where you want to get more punch from clouds and sky. You will lose up to a stop of light depending on the polarization, so that's why I'd say not for indoor or low light use, (unless you are purposely trying to force a long exposure)
     
  3. duelinthedeep

    duelinthedeep TPF Noob!

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    i actually bought one a few days ago. a while ago i asked how i could achive a certain effect and i was told to get a pl filter.
    i've been using it alot and i could actually see a bit of difference in my pictures, with the color and what-not, but its not much of a difference.
    even though i have been using one i dont know much of it, to tell you the truth..
    i had no idea the filter had to be set a certain way..
    i,obviously, have some unanswered questions myself.:confused:
     
  4. kfoster

    kfoster TPF Noob!

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    By rotating the polarising filter it will change the effect. So the orientation will depend on the effect you want for the shot. You can see the change in effect by looking thru the viewfinder while rotating the filter while its on the lens.

    This filter will does a nice job of reducing glare when shooting against glass or water. Plus it will make the sky more blue and clouds more defind. But its not a filter to use for everyday shooting.
     
  5. duelinthedeep

    duelinthedeep TPF Noob!

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    oh...i see...whats the difference between a cpl and a pl?
     
  6. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    I'm assuming by cpl you mean circular polarizer and by pl you mean linear polarizer.

    Modern cameras these days have sophisticated AF and metering systems, some of which polarize light inside the camera in order to direct it to the focusing / metering sensor thingy. As a result, sometimes linear polarizers will not work properly with some cameras' AF or AE systems. The cure for this problem is to use a circular polarizer, which polarizes light in a different way and will work with those systems that are otherwise tricked by linears. The effect on the image is the same between both kinds; the only difference is that circulars work with cameras that linears do not. The downside to circular polarizers is that they're more expensive than linear polarizers.
     
  7. duelinthedeep

    duelinthedeep TPF Noob!

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    yea, ive noticed.
    thanks for the info.:thumbup:
     
  8. MyCameraEye

    MyCameraEye TPF Noob!

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    Here's an easy way to learn to use your polarizer. Do you have a large slideing glass door in your house or any large window that is near a lamp. Turn the lamp on and get an annoying light reflection on the glass. Now look through your camera while your rotate your polarizer and when you see the reflection go away, this would be the sweet spot. Typically a 90° angle from the light.

    Scott
     

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