Polaroid Transfers

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by Nikon Fan, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. Nikon Fan

    Nikon Fan TPF Noob!

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    Have to do one of these for a printmaking class, and I knew Terri would be able to provide some insight, but I'm asking advice from everyone...I've read the basic technique of how to do it, although it seems that maybe there are different ways it can be done...

    So what's the best way to create a polaroid transfer?
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Poor girlie. ;) Tossed into the realm of the alt-world, with us scary folk. :lol:

    So, have they been clear as to what you have to do? Is it a "Polaroid image trnasfer" or a "Polaroid EMULSION transfer"? (We agreed here long ago to call them emulsion lifts, to help keep from confusing the two).

    I don't dare go into anything lengthy until you know exactly what your assignment is.

    In the meantime, you can always click here for a rough overview of the image transfer: http://www.polaroid.com/global/printer_friendly.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524441759987&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=282574488338439&bmUID=1130377790345&bmLocale=en_US

    I don't always agree with everything Polaroid says. Ask for specifics when you know what you're after. You know I'll talk your head off till you beg me to stop! :mrgreen:
     
  3. Karalee

    Karalee hOtLiPs!

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    I like doing wet transfers... mainly cause theyre easier :lol: and I like the surreal watercolor type effect. Are you all using a land camera, or a daylab type machine?
     
  4. Nikon Fan

    Nikon Fan TPF Noob!

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    He wasn't specific on either, but I'd assume it would be Image transfer rather than emulsion. The teach hasn't ever done them before nor knows how either...so it should be interesting...he just said we needed a polaroid camera, film, and paper, is that it?

    Thanks for the link Terri :) If you have a brief breakdown of the process for a beginner that would be great...you know I'm a digital darkroom junkie so this could be comical ;) :lol:
     
  5. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    How are supposed to get your Polaroid print? Will you have access to a Daylab?

    Make sure you have hot pressed watercolor paper. Arches is my preference. Any art supply store will have it, check the paper bins.

    You'll need a rubber brayer.
    Couple of 8x10 developing trays.
    Distilled water.
    Polaroid film, probably 669
    Print squeegee
    Glass or ceramic sheet
    Heating pad

    The main thing you're doing is prematurely separating the Polaroid print, so the inks don't have a chance to migrate and can be "transferred" to another receptor surface (in this case, HP watercolor paper) with the image intact.

    Rip down your large piece of WC paper by folding in half, tearing, and those 2 pieces in half again, tearing, etc.

    Once you've made your Polaroid print, from the camera or a Daylab using a 35mm color slide, pull your print out rapidly and wait 10-12 seconds. If you wait too long, the dyes will migrate too much and you'll have a faint transfer. If you separate much sooner, you can end up with a very yellow transfer. So, be mentally ready.

    Turn on your heating pad and lay your piece of glass over it. You want the glass to be warm, but not HOT to the touch. Have your piece of paper soaked in 90' distilled water (I do this at home on the stovetop. You can laugh about this vision later.). You can use the 8x10 trays if you can keep the water temp constant, or use a shallow pan on the stove with a candy thermometer. Think it through and lay everything out before you begin.

    Before you expose the print, remove the paper after 30 seconds or so and GENTLY squeegee off excess water, then lie flat on your warm glass.

    Expose your print, count to 10, separate the negative and toss the positive. Carefully press your negative onto the damp paper. Get your brayer and with light pressure roll the negative into place, taking care not to smudge the negative. Start in the middle and roll out in all directions. Let it sit on the warm glass a full 1-2 minutes, but not too much longer. You'll be doing a few until you get the timing figured out as to what's best for you.

    I like to peel the negative underwater, so once I've rolled several times, back to the 90' water tray I go. I slip the entire negative (still glued to the paper) completely under the water and slowly peel off the negative and toss it. Slowly remove the paper and your image should be there.
     
  6. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    And don't be intimidated by all those words up there. ;)

    Gather up everything, lay it out carefully, have everything lined up neatly and ready to go. Walk through it mentally before you start, if that helps.

    Hopefully, you'll have access to a Daylab, for it's the easiest way to make Polaroid prints. You can shoot a roll of slide film in advance, and have more interesting images to play with.

    Have fun with it, it's a blast. And so much more rewarding than hitting "watercolor effect" in photoshop. :mrgreen: Sorry, it had to be said. :lol:
     
  7. Nikon Fan

    Nikon Fan TPF Noob!

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    I'm not familiar with Daylab, I looked at the link you posted but I don't think our school has one...

    The equipment I have is a Polaroid 660 camera, Polaroid 600 film (all walmart has, and I won't be able to get anything different until next week sometime) and darkroom access (so the trays, glass, squeegee and all that jazz wouldn't be a problem)...is it necessary to have the Daylab or can this be done with just the camera, film, and some watercolor paper? It sounds like it from the process you listed but I wanted to make sure...And will the 600 film work at all?

    Thanks so much Terri...I won't even disagree with you on the Photoshop comment either :)
     
  8. Karalee

    Karalee hOtLiPs!

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    Hmm, you may have yourself a pickle here, as you cant manipulate polaroid 600. What you want is a land camera that accepts 669 chica.
     
  9. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    600 film.....? Head back to the Polaroid site to attest this for certain, but I think you'll be disappointed in your results. The film types ending with a "9" are the ones best used for these techniques. 669, 59, 79, 809..... Check before you spend any money!!

    I'll help however I can. :D
     
  10. Nikon Fan

    Nikon Fan TPF Noob!

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    Thanks guys :) Looks like I'll have to wait and get some proper equipment...I think another girl in class is going to try out the 600 film, but I don't want to waste the money if I don't have too...thanks for the help both of you :) I'll be back with more questions when I get the right stuff ;)
     
  11. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Awww, that's too bad! :( But at least you'll get a chance to see first hand why the 600 won't work.

    You can, as Karalee suggested, find a camera that will take the 669. Head back to the Polaroid site if you want, and look for their "which film does my camera take?" page. (Well, words to that effect.) :lol: You should be able to pick one up.

    I am curious as to why your instructor would ask you to do something like this without providing a Daylab or access to the appropriate camera, though. You can't just up and do this technique; it calls for pretty specific equipment.
     
  12. Nikon Fan

    Nikon Fan TPF Noob!

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    He doesn't know anything about photography and just thought all you had to do was take a polaroid, peel it apart, and stick it on some paper...he thought I was crazy when I told him it wouldn't work :meh: I'll check out the page and see if I can't find something on ebay...I'd really like to give this process a try, sounds and looks like fun with the appropriate setup :) I swear I won't try and fake it in Photoshop just for you Terri :lol:
     

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