pole a roid crew

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by captain-spanky, Jun 6, 2005.

  1. captain-spanky

    captain-spanky TPF Noob!

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    hello!
    been reading bit here and there about all this polaroiding... the manipulation with sticks and pointy things and the boiling and restickin images and stuff...

    I'm wanting to give it a go now... :)
    But where do i start? if i could get hold of a Polaroid SX70 Land camera and get some 'time-zero' film... would that do me ok for the emulsion lifts AND the manipulation with pointy things?
    :)
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Well, hey there, Cap'n! :salute: Nice to see you wandering in over here. :)

    Time Zero film is the emulsion formula that allows for manipulation. Yep, it fits into SX-70 Land cams, which regularly show up on ebay (just read descriptions carefully). It's a LOT of fun, and you get those "instant" results. ;)

    For emulsion lifts and image transfers, generally speaking, the Polaroid films that lend themselves to this technique end with a "9" - the most common being 669, larger formats 59, 79, 809. You can get a Polaroid camera that shoots 669 film, but it is definitely different than Time Zero film.

    669 film is a "peel apart" film and Time Zero develops while you watch.

    Dive right in, the water's fine! :D
     
  3. captain-spanky

    captain-spanky TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Terri! :D
    are there any specific cameras which will take both types of film?
    or is this where the slide printers make their appearence? :)
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Unfortunately, no - these films are different formats so the P-cams are exclusive.

    Depending on the slide printer, it can be an expensive OR fairly inexpensive way to go. The Vivitar is a great little slide printer, BUT it's only going to take 669. You still gain freedom, because suddenly every slide you ever shot can be converted to an image transfer or emulsion lift, which is a wonderful discovery (and gives you lots of practice if you have slides lying about).

    The Daylab has interchangable bases, one for 669, one for 4x5 film, and one for Time Zero. It's THE most expensive way to go, but gives you everything for small/MF.

    The least expensive way to start is using the camera(s). (If you decide SX-70 manips aren't for you, the camera is STILL great for "instant" images.) If you want to stick with it, start thinking about slide printers. :thumbup:
     
  5. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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  6. captain-spanky

    captain-spanky TPF Noob!

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    Cheers y'awl!!! :D

    oh Ferny... I think i've always dwelled in the wallet reducing side... it's just different things have been out to get me... classic cars.. photography... women.. :lol:
     
  7. sillyphaunt

    sillyphaunt TPF Noob!

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    Welcome! I'm just a few steps ahead of you in the journey, got started with a land camera, then got a slide printer.. Its a great process! I haven't tried any lifts yet, that's next on my list.

    If you're looking to snag a land camera you can check ebay, they have them quite often.

    Ask questions and ask often, The P-team is VERY helpful and if they were willing to put up with my questions i'm sure nothing you ask could be a stupid question.

    I look forward to seeing what you come up with!
     
  8. captain-spanky

    captain-spanky TPF Noob!

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    ok heres a thing...

    I think i've found a SX70 land cam... but i've just been to the local camera shop and they've said they stock 600 film but not 'time-zero' (in fact, they didn't know what time zero was..) is it the same thing as they say or am i not going to be able to manipulate it properly?
    I tried an old fujifilm instax camera which is supposed to use the same stuff as the 600 polarid film and it didn't manipulate at all...
    I'm getting lost already! :(
     
  9. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Some places sell Time Zero and some don't. It's easy to find the 600 film, for some reason. Sometimes people don't know what you mean by "Time Zero", you can call it "SX 70" film too and sometimes that rings a bell (even though the proper name is Time Zero). And you can always find it online. I usually get mine from B&H, or someplace like that.

    And no, you're not going to be able to manipulate the 600 film - remember, Time Zero has a very special emulsion formula, and it's the only one for that technique. Don't waste your money or listen to salespeople who know less than you do. You want an SX-70 Land camera and Time Zero film. Period. The end. ;)
     
  10. captain-spanky

    captain-spanky TPF Noob!

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    Thanks again Terri! :D :D :D

    but woah! holy crap! I've just noticed how much Time Zero costs! £72 for 60 shots! :shock: :shock:
    I think i've become too used to the freeness of digital!


    hang on... i can get 60 shots for £72 in this country... or i can get them posted from america and it's £60 for 100 shots?!?!? what's THAT all about???
     
  11. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    hmmmm, I've no idea. :scratch: It does seem backwards, doesn't it? But no, it's not cheap film. Polaroid, being the former "instant" image king, suffered greatly when digital came on the market, you know. Naturally the cost has gone up while they try to hang on. Just another reason for me not to like digital. ;) So, it's an expensive learning curve until you get the hang of doing manips, and when you do, you learn to shoot with some discretion. :razz:
     
  12. sillyphaunt

    sillyphaunt TPF Noob!

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    Yeah, the process is a bit spendy. I just dropped another $50 to get some slide film and 2 packs of Time Zero film. *sigh* The price of our art! :lol:
     

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