Portrait of your camera(s)

Discussion in 'Photo Themes' started by Jeremy Z, Jan 7, 2007.

  1. Jeremy Z

    Jeremy Z No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    We owe so much to them. We use the to take portraits of others.

    I had a couple of very good ones of my old Nikon FM2n, but they're prints, and I don't have a scanner.

    I know you guys all love your cameras too. Let's see those camera portraits?
     
  2. Danimal_Inc

    Danimal_Inc TPF Noob!

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    My Sony, taken with my Fuji p&s...not the best shot but its all i got :)

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  3. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    posted these already, but here are some of mine:

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  4. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    hope i did not misuse this thread by posting images different from what was expected ;)
     
  5. Jeremy Z

    Jeremy Z No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Not at all Alex! In fact, vintage cameras are probably more photogenic in general.

    This is an 'assignment' I'm giving myself, keeping it in the back of my head. I'll probably post to this thread over and over again, maybe once every 6 months or something?

    I don't know if I want to bother to scan the nice ones I already have; I probably should, since I don't have the camera any more.
     
  6. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    go for it.. scanning is not such a pain and often worth it :)
     
  7. PNA

    PNA TPF Noob!

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    An all time favorite........



    [​IMG]

    Had a Voigtlander many, many years ago
     
  8. ahelg

    ahelg TPF Noob!

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    Ah. A Nikon F camera. Brilliant work horses. I've never actually had a chance to use one, but I have held one, and I wanted one strait away. Another camera for my wish list.
     
  9. Kevyn

    Kevyn TPF Noob!

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    hehe i thought i'd post my shots here it seems appropriate and you did recomend it, :):):)

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    thanks :)
     
  10. Jeremy Z

    Jeremy Z No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    My Olympus OM1n. My grandpa gave it to me about 8 years ago, when he found that it was getting too difficult to focus, he gave it to me, and made me promise not to sell it. He sometimes "settles" when it comes to buying quality stuff, but not this time. He vowed to only buy Zuiko lenses for it. (Remember, this was in the 70s and 80s, when zooms were clearly inferior to primes) I've since added a couple of zooms. The Sigma 28-84, I got on ebay from a Greek guy a few years back for something like $20. The Tokina "Special" was from someone else on ebay, also reasonably priced. The only real problem with this camera is that it was designed for mercury batteries, so now the exposure is always slightly off, as alkalines are the only ones commonly available. It isn't a big deal, since I don't shoot slides.

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    A couple neat little details about this camera: Since the flash hot shoe is interchangeable, and since the eyepiece of the prism is narrow enough, I can take it off simply by unscrewing the little nut that's built into the shoe, and the eyepiece goes under my eyebrow and fits comfortably against my face.

    The shutter speed dial is around the lens, where the aperture ring is on most mechanical SLRs of the era. The aperture ring is toward the end of the lens, and the focusing is in the middle.

    The depth of field preview and lens release buttons are built into each lens. This keeps the body nice & compact, and the lenses don't seem any bigger either.

    The power to the light meter is manually switched, so if I am taking a lot of flash or bulb shots, or if I am taking a lot of pix at the same exposure, I don't have to run the battery down. (the light meter is the only thing that uses battery power in this camera)
     
  11. Jeremy Z

    Jeremy Z No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    This is another hand-me-down from my grandpa. It is a Yashica Electro 35. I don't know if it is from the 1960s or 1970s. It is an aperture priority automatic exposure camera, with settings for bulb and flash sync. It has a very good "Yashinon" f/1.9 lens, and the camera is a beast. It has a much bigger body than the OM1n does.

    Since it uses the battery for all shutter speeds, the battery is a monster. This one also uses a mercury battery which is out of production due to environmental concern. (and rightly so) So I don't dare shoot slides with it.

    Interesting things about this one: The self-timer is a lever protruding from the side of the lens, which keeps the front of the body cleaner.

    It has a cold shoe flash mount, with a sync cord that plugs into the side of the body.

    See the little green area next to the film advance lever & shot counter? There is a red button on the back of the camera (just visible in the second shot) that I can press that illuminates that light if the battery is good. It is nice to know whether the battery is good BEFORE I start shooting, hehehe.

    On the top, there are LEDs to tell me if the shutter cannot go fast enough or slow enough to match the aperture I've set. Yashica put little pictures next to the aperture to let me know where I should set it if it is sunny, cloudy, or indoors. How nice of them! Photography was not point and shoot in those days, but the manufacturers did try!

    The only flaw in this camera is a slightly dented filter ring, so I can't use filters. It is thin aluminum, so I don't dare try to bend it back.

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  12. Jeremy Z

    Jeremy Z No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Here's my Canon SD600 Digital Elph. I shouldn't like this camera as much as I do, since it doesn't have any manual settings. But for a pocket-sized point and shoot, who cares? It has scene-specific programs for anything I can imagine. It has a "rule of thirds grid" that can be superimposed on the large 2.5" LCD.

    The lens extension motor is VERY quiet. The camera feels solid & is very heavy & well-built. One gripe: there is nowhere to put my right thumb while shooting. It naturally falls right over the speaker. It can be moved over a bit to rest on the mode switch. But that is the sacrifice for an ultra-compact camera. Also, I'm nervous about the outer lens shutters. I would have preferred something less fragile, like a thin clamshell cover. These little guys tend to get sticky over time, and it can be very frustrating. I'm combatting this by carrying it in a small case most of the time, and in my hand the rest of the time. Never in a linty pocket.

    The lens itself is very sharp for this class of camera. The photos of my Pentax K100D, below, were taken with this camera.

    The reason I bought this camera was because I found myself missing photo opportunities because I didn't want to drag my ultrazoom around. With this one, there is no excuse. Just put it in its case and put it in a jacket pocket, in the backpack, or on my belt.

    I like this camera just as much as my digital SLR. It is a perfect compliment, as it is everything the SLR isn't (and vice versa) Everyone should have an ultra-compact, IMO.

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    It is lost on that tripod shoe, huh? :D
     

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