portrait photography

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by skatephoto, Jul 19, 2004.

  1. skatephoto

    skatephoto TPF Noob!

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    any suggestion on how to make a little studio in my house.(with things from around the house or stuff that costs next to nothing) also is there any suggestions on lighting, as far as softning the light and stuff like that.(with things from around the house or stuff that cost next to nothing). my friend went to a model angency and got pictures taken but he said he had to pay like 600 bucks for the pictures so i said, damn, i will take pictures of you. just pay for the prints and ill pay for the film. im sure it will turn out to be a joke but still be a good time either way. thanks
     
  2. tr0gd0o0r

    tr0gd0o0r TPF Noob!

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    Personally, I think the easiest way to get the best result for the money is to do portraiture outside. But for a studio i've seen other suggest, getting construction spolights, then get some photography bulbs from a camera store, you can use sheets to diffuse with and white corkboard or something as reflectors. Also, if you're using digital then you could prolly just use the normal bulbs and use the white balance.
     
  3. Artemis

    Artemis Just Punked Himself

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    This may be to expensive for yah, but if you wanna do it for money, get something like this.

    A studio kit

    Hope it helps.
     
  4. Alison

    Alison Swiss Army Friend Supporting Member

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    I agree, outdoors is probably the easiest way to get the right lighting. If you have a flash, make sure you do some fill flash to get the details in the subject. I have trouble getting the lighting right in my home even with the proper studio equiptment, though I know some people here get great results with items they have made themselves. If you're working inside make sure to diffuse your light so that your subject doesn't look washed out or have harsh shadows.
     

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