"posing" Bighorn sheep - C/C welcome

Discussion in 'Nature & Wildlife' started by tahmail, Jul 13, 2008.

  1. tahmail

    tahmail TPF Noob!

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    Please provide any C&C - I'm trying to improve on my wildlife shots. Thanks in advance!

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  2. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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    I think it's excellent. The only thing I can think of to mention is maybe a suggestion to lop off the right portion (almost right up to his horn) in a crop to give it some direction and become a little less centered.

    Beyond that it's just about perfect - short of walking over with a comb and giving him the brillcream treatment. :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2008
  3. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    I like it. The lighting is a bit harsh, but that was probably beyond your control. Maybe a little less exposure would avoid the wash-out of his nose. In any event, good shooting. I live in AZ and have yet to see a wild one.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Nice shot, the shallow DOF isolates the subject very well, which is a good technique for shooting wildlife.

    For something to improve on...really good wildlife shots will often create some connection from the subject to the viewer. Eye contact is a good one...so if you have the animal looking right at the camera/viewer, you can create that connection. In this shot, it looks like the ram is looking to our left (his right) rather than right at us...so we don't really have that connection.

    If you can't have them looking at you, it can help to have them looking at something that is in the frame, so that the viewer can identify with what the animal is looking at...and pretend that they know what it's thinking.

    These are somethings that apply to portraits of people, but if you can make portraits of animals...it often makes for great shots.

    Of course, they are wild animals so you can't really control or direct them...so sometimes you just get what you get.
     
  5. saltface

    saltface TPF Noob!

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    Actually, I think he is looking at us. Big horn sheep don't have stereoscopic vision, so turning the head to one side is the way they go.

    This guy was watching us:

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  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    You are probably right. Looking back at some of my shots...they are doing the same thing.
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  7. tahmail

    tahmail TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the excellent comments. I see what you mean about having the subject looking at the camera to draw the viewer into the scene. I looked back at this deer shot from two weeks ago and it does make a difference.


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