Post-Production Lightroom?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by TheBoombaGnome, Apr 19, 2010.

  1. TheBoombaGnome

    TheBoombaGnome TPF Noob!

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    I recently came across a copy of Adobe Lightroom 2 through my dad's job (he's in IT so he gets a bunch of random programs). I started playing around with it, but it seems that there are a lot of things on there that I could do in Photoshop (I have CS4) which I am very quick with. Anyone use Lightroom at all? I'm wondering if it's worth trying to learn how to use it for PP or if I'd be better off just sticking with Photoshop...

    Thanks guys!

    Boomba
     
  2. Jon0807

    Jon0807 TPF Noob!

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    I could be wrong but I believe LR2 just takes specific features from PS, mainly for use with photographs, and bunches them all in one sleek program. Usually for those who don't want the entire PS package and just want something to process photos with. So if you have CS4 and know how to use it then I would say you don't really need LR since CS4 can do everything LR can do and more.
     
  3. Josh220

    Josh220 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Lightroom is where many people do the most of their editing. Then they send the pictures that need fine tuning into CS4. LR is a great RAW processor.
     
  4. fokker

    fokker No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Lightroom isn't meant to replace photoshop, but its great to have both. Lightroom is awesome for importing RAW files, doing basic raw adjustements (that are completley reversible) and managing your files. If you take the time to learn it and set it up properly then it's invaluable for cataloging your photos so they are organised and easy to find.
     
  5. FattyMcJ

    FattyMcJ TPF Noob!

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    Couldn't have said it better myself.
     
  6. Nameless

    Nameless TPF Noob!

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    LR isn't meant to replace CS4. It's used mainly as a workflow tool as it's much easier to manage hundreds of images from a shoot, say for example a wedding. The library module allows you to import, sort, view, and select your images to keep much more easily that with CS4. It also has a develop module that works very well for RAW processing and basic PP. Most 'togs will still use CS4 for layers and masks, but realistically, your not going to do that much PP for weddings of 800+ images. That is where LR comes in.
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, LR is awesome and as mentioned, is best used in conjunction with Photoshop. It does many of the same things that Photoshop (and Bridge) does...but it's much more streamlined.

    Under the surface, LR's hidden goodness is that it's a completely non-destructive workflow. When you work on images, the changes are never saved onto the original files, but are saved into a 'sidecar' file instead. Then changes are only applied when you export, so you can edit/change as much as you want in LR, the image maintains it's integrity.
     
  8. fokker

    fokker No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I must admit it took a little while to get used to lightroom, and at first I found it cumbersome but forced myself to stick it out and get into the habit of having a proper workflow, glad that I did now.
     
  9. DerekSalem

    DerekSalem TPF Noob!

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    I use CS4 and Lightroom all the time. I use Lightroom for my library stuff (keeping it all in check and in place, doing library-wide or set-wide enhancements, etc...) and I use CS4 for severe modification or stuff I need to do by hand.
     
  10. myfotoguy

    myfotoguy TPF Noob!

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    I Agree with the use it for cataloging comments. All my photos are searchable by keywords, which works super slick!

    And quick, basic, non-destructible edits can really streamline your workflow.

    I don't have Lightroom, but ACDSee Pro3 and use it as others have described using Lightroom. I use it for cataloging and non-destructible JPEG edits and occasional RAW. I usually process RAW through NX2.

    For most processes and edits, the workflow within ACDSee Pro covers 90% of the edits I need. It will depend of course on your style and the edits you need to make. The editing functions are fantastic for most everyday needs that I have. Plus, I really like the non-destructive aspect of it. I imagine LR is the same.
     
  11. TheBoombaGnome

    TheBoombaGnome TPF Noob!

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    Thanks guys!

    I was looking around it and was getting really confused with a lot of what it can do, as I'm used to Photoshop (which isn't designed SPECIFICALLY for photographs), so it was strange having settings dedicated to photos. I think this will be the time when I start getting used to how everything works, so hopefully by the time I pick up my dSLR, I'll be able to know what the heck is going on with the program!!

    Thanks guys!

    Oh, and if you have any useful hints that you stumbled across that can save me a bit of time, that'd be pretty sweet too :)
     
  12. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    My advice, if you really want to use LR, is to put a decent amount of effort into learning about it. I hear a lot of people say that they just don't 'get it' right away, and some of them don't bother going any farther with it.

    There is certainly a bit of a learning curve, especially with the way that you handle your image files. For example, before I was using LR, I would use Photoshop (or RawShooter Essentials) to process my Raw files. Then I would save them as a standard image type (PSD/TIFF/JPEG) and edit them in Photoshop. I would save a 'working' copy, with layers etc, then I'd save a JPEG copy for printing (maybe multiple copies for different print sizes) and I'd also save a copy for uploading to the web.

    With LR, I can always work on the 'master' image and output whatever files I need, at any time. One good example is the cropping. In Photoshop, when you crop an image (say to an 8x10 format) it tosses out the trimmings, so you would probably need to save it as a copy. If you do any further editing to it, it's only on that 8x10 file...and if you decided you wanted a different print ratio, you would have to go back to the master file and maybe make the same edits again.
    With LR, you can crop an image and output the cropped size, but you can always go back and change/undo the crop. The same applies to most things in LR.

    When I first started using LR, I read a few books on it, and spent many hours reading & watching tutorials. I think it really paid off because now I use LR all the time. Even when I need to edit in Photoshop, I use the 'edit in...' command in LR, which takes the image directly into Photoshop, and then brings it back into LR.

    Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Killer Tips
    Free Adobe Lightroom Tutorials | Layers Magazine
    https://admin.adobe.acrobat.com/_a295153/p50615485/?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal
    Inside Lightroom
    AdobeTV
     

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