Pregnant silos - studio b&w (Warning - NUDITY)

Discussion in 'The Professional Gallery' started by Jazz, Jan 22, 2007.

  1. Jazz

    Jazz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2006
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    It helps so much when the customer/model is into making images, as she was. These were shot with a Hassie 120/f4 on Delta 100, with white seamless. Then I made fiber prints for her. Eventually, I scanned the prints and put the three individual photos together into a single image in PS. (The silo effect was created in the studio, not in PS.)

    I find it difficult to pose pregnant women, and would welcome all comments on the posing, or anything else, too. Thanks for looking.



    [​IMG]
     
  2. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Messages:
    6,071
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    in the middle of north carolina
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    actually I like on a purely graphic arts level. It is a very striking image and would make a nice wall hanging in like a hallway.
     
  3. just x joey

    just x joey TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    946
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Ocean City, MD
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    how'd u do that?
     
  4. Alison

    Alison Swiss Army Friend Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2004
    Messages:
    9,469
    Likes Received:
    96
    Location:
    TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I really like #1 & 3, I'm not sure about the hand/arm position in the 2nd one. I like how you've put these together, very nicely done!
     
  5. Jazz

    Jazz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2006
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    ms - thank you. (I think that's exactly what she's done with it)

    just x - I'm happy to answer any questions, but you'll have to be more specific.

    Alison - Thanks for the feedback, I appreciate it
     
  6. Cuervo79

    Cuervo79 Guest

    Personally I find it striking, and I am most interested in how did you make the silouette on the studio witout loosing alot of detail. Did you over expose later on or was it all done on camera?
    Regarding the poses I personaly like 3 most of all although to me I find in the pose sorrow (dunno its just me and it doesn't make it a bad pose completely the contrary) I imagine her face with a sad look.
    Did you explore any other type of poses?
     
  7. Jazz

    Jazz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2006
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks Cuervo. I shot only five different poses, but worked to fine tune each one. The shoot took about 45 minutes, with a 10 minute break in the middle. I provided a bathrobe for the model to wear into the studio and during the break, and am always aware of the model’s comfort factor. I have the poses planned and practiced with the model ahead of time, while she is still fully clothed, then again in the bathrobe. That way, when she removes the robe, she knows exactly what to do.

    For the silo, I should mention that there are lots of ways to do this. Mine is not the only way, nor do I claim it’s any better than any other way. Whatever works. I do it in the camera. For me, a studio shoot is a series of solving problems. Two big problems are 1) a small studio (the model is only about 6-8 ft away from the background) and 2) white walls and ceiling. So, I create a big black box. The walls are permanently covered with black felt to soak up light. For this shot, I also covered the floor in black felt. Even the white seamless background is covered in black felt, right up to the edge of the frame. While looking through the lens, we move the black felt in until it shows in the background, then move it out so that it’s just slightly outside the frame of the picture. So the only thing in the room that’s white is the background that you see in the image, and the ceiling (which is a problem). If I could have a black ceiling, I would.

    I do all this to avoid any light reflecting back onto the model from the background. The background is lit with two heads, one on each side, at an angle so the light reflecting off the background will bounce off into the black felt walls. A reflective reading of 22.5 is used on the background. Lens is f16. Focusing is done ahead of time, the floor is taped for the model location. The modeling lamps are turned down low, for modesty. But I do need a little light from the modeling lamps in order to compose.

    I normally (over)expose the Delta 100 at 64, and underdevelop. This is to ensure that there’s plenty of shadow detail, which I like. But for this kind of shot, which has no detail, I could overdevelop to help, but I don’t, because 1) if I’ve done it right in the studio, it isn’t necessary and 2) I don’t like to change development, ever. It adds another variable into my system, and would keep my prints from talking back. If I do it right, the thin negs will immediately reveal the paper’s best black in the silo (body) area.

    Hope this helps.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

b&w nudity

,

b&w pregnant forum

,
pregnant b&w gallery
,
pregnant nudity