Preparing and printing art photos

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by Inglenook, Oct 25, 2009.

  1. Inglenook

    Inglenook TPF Noob!

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    What (other than the usual Photoshopping) needs to be done to prepare a pic to print a large size (say, 30" x 45"), to insure the best possible quality?

    In the same vein, I'm interested in a good commercial printer, and knowing the best paper that'll give the best impression.
     
  2. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    If you're making images with a DSLR you'll likely have to upsize the images to print 30x45.

    The largest pro lab in the country, Millers Professional Imaging's, largest inkjet paper print size is only 30x40. You'll have to shop around for labs that can print 45".

    At any rate, you would need to check with the lab that would be doing your printing work. You should ask for their recommendations for image file preperation and get their inkjet printer ICC profiles from them so you can soft proof before you order images that large.

    If you opt for off-set printing or lithography rather than inkjet printing (also know as Giclee) a whole new subset of requirements are in order.
     
  3. Inglenook

    Inglenook TPF Noob!

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    Thanks, Keith.
     
  4. loopy

    loopy Brave little froggy...

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    Lithograph is generally more expensive than Giclee, and the quality isn't as good. Offset lithography is a 4 colour process, while inkjet printers used to create Giclees provide 8-12 colours. Not to mention Giclee prints generally have a longer life span.

    Look into Enhanced matte (especially for b&w prints) and the premium photo luster paper. Ask your printer to provide samples so you can get a feel for the paper. Somerset Velvet is also very nice.

    As for set up, ask your printer what they recommend.
     
  5. RancerDS

    RancerDS TPF Noob!

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    When you say "pro lab", you apparently meant they do the lab work for professional photographers. Just called for prices on enlargements and they confirmed they do not process for amateur photographers.
     
  6. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Yes, Millers has an application process that must be completed before you will be accepted as a customer. Many photographers, whose businesses are only part-time are accepted. If you sell any of your images, you may well qualify.

    However, they have a online consumer division www.mpix.com that uses most of the same printing equipment since both (and the new MpixPro) are in the same group of buildings in Pittsburg, Kansas. Mpix prints up to 24x36.
     

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