Printer/Monitor calibration?

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by Becky, Aug 30, 2007.

  1. Becky

    Becky TPF Noob!

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    I'm currently putting together a small scale portfolio of my work... I have a great A3 printer, Canon i9950 and am for this task using a Macbook.

    I didn't imagine I'd have any huge issues here, but the difference between the brightness/blackness between my screen and the prints is pretty drastic. The prints really only become acceptable when I up the brightness/fiddle with the levels of my photos, and by doing so they look awful on screen... but look a lot better on paper. It is however, quite a trial and error method and aside from being sick of wasting expensive paper its just a daft way of working.

    I don't really want to resort to buying calibration hardware such as pantone colorvision (though I hear its pretty decent)...

    Truthfully, my screen is usually set to maximum brightness, but this is also the case with a windows based laptop I also use, and I have never had the same issues with screen/print differences.

    I don't know much about Canon colour management, but I'll go into all that if it looks like I have to. Is it a case of Canon printer/ink and paper to be closest to accuracy in this case?

    Any thoughts?... or is this just going to be another random hitch in my Mac-move?!
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I thought I could get away without monitor calibration...but I couldn't. When I first did it, the difference was amazing.

    I haven't calibrated my Canon printer but using Canon paper seems to give me very nice prints. I tried some cheaper paper and the results were terrible.

    If you really want to be accurate, calibrating both the monitor and the printer is the way to go.
     
  3. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The differences in brightness / blacks can be largely to do with the fact that paper is not backlit. Do you use Photoshop? If so you can setup a printer proof which with a single keystroke will show what the images looks like with the converted printer colour profile and dulled down whites and blacks.

    This is the closest I have come to getting exactly what I see on the screen out of the printer.
     
  4. glaston

    glaston TPF Noob!

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    This might be a no-brainer for you, but deserves mention.

    You ARE converting from RGB to CMYK before printing right?
     
  5. D-50

    D-50 TPF Noob!

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    Do you really eed to convert to CMYK before printing? I experience the same exactly problem with brightness, I have found if I increase my brightness to +22 to +30 before printing the result is very close to my monitor but I would also like to fix the probleminstead of just working around it.
     

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