Printing on metal

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by Niffer, Oct 4, 2007.

  1. Niffer

    Niffer TPF Noob!

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    So I've been toying around with the idea of printing on metal, so far all I've been told is to try paint on photo emulsion. I tried this on aluminum, steel, and copper. I sanded down each piece and painted on the chemical then let it dry, i then exposed it and lastly placed it into developer. To my not so big of a surprise the emulsion came right off. After cursing the photo god I can here...
    Does anyone know how to print on metal?
    I will literately worship the ground you walk on :hail:
     
  2. oldnavy170

    oldnavy170 TPF Noob!

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    Sorry I can't help you in this department.
     
  3. gomexz

    gomexz TPF Noob!

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    Then why post at all?

    try developing it normally and then take it to a vinyl shop and have them make it with vinyl and then put that on the metal.
     
  4. ScottS

    ScottS TPF Noob!

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    Why post to ask her why she posted at all? :sexywink::lmao:

    I agree with him, I tried doing this once for a photo project... and failed miserably.
     
  5. ThomThomsk

    ThomThomsk TPF Noob!

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    There was an article in Black & White Photography magazine (the UK one) about a guy who makes tintypes and has a fantastic series on cowboys. This is a 19th century wetplate process that is probably more trouble than you want, but I recall that the finished images have to be varnished to protect them - perhaps that's something you could try.

    Google tells me that he is called Robb Kendrick and on his website there are videos in which he demonstrates the whole process. Click 'tintype portfolio' and then 'the process' -

    http://www.robbkendrick.com/
     
  6. JC1220

    JC1220 TPF Noob!

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  7. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    Try Rockland Liquid Light or Ag-Plus, subbed with two coats of polyurethane. Rockland's website has information: http://www.rockaloid.com/

    Best,
    Helen
     
  8. Niffer

    Niffer TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the ideas guys! if it works I'll post pictures :lovey:
     
  9. oldnavy170

    oldnavy170 TPF Noob!

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    Thats because people like to know that someone is listening even if they don't have any answers. Got anymore questions?? :p
     
  10. usobbt

    usobbt TPF Noob!

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    Try going to booksmartstudio.com. They have aluminum sheets that are compatible with ink jet printers, as long as it's a "J" type feed, which is what most are. I have an Epson 1280 and can print on aluminum. The down side is that you're limited to 8.5 x 10 sheets at .005 thickness. Anything larger has to be thicker and anything thicker needs a straight through type printer. You can also try inkaid.com, but I think they get their supplies from booksmartstudio.
     
  11. ponkan

    ponkan TPF Noob!

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    I would try adding a layer of gelatin on the metal before coating with liquid light. http://www.alternativephotography.com/process_dryplate.html has a process that describes gelatin and chrome alum (hardener) on glass plates -- no real reason you can't do it on other surfaces.

    The problem with collodion processes (wet-plate and tintype/ambrotype) is that tintypes and ambrotypes (tintype is on tin, ambrotype is on glass) is that they are direct-positive processes, which means you need to shoot the original scene. You only get one copy since it's a unique process, and you need to coat, sensitize, expose, and process the plate while the collodion is wet.
     
  12. Mike Jordan

    Mike Jordan TPF Noob!

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    Another reason to post is that it brings the thread back up to the top so it doesn't get buried and forgotten in a day or two.

    One technique I've been praticing with is embedding an image inside glass. The image is printed on clear photo paper (like a decal) put on or between glass and then this is cooked at about 1470 degrees. The image turns sepia and you can get different results from the glass and image, but with the right image it's pretty neat looking. I've done two that I put inbetween the glass and then melted the glass around it.

    Mike
     

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