problems with ambient light

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by tom beard, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. tom beard

    tom beard TPF Noob!

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    I'm learning my D-90 and went out to shoot a field of daffodils at about 1:00pm. The light was very bright and I was trying to use different settings like aperture priority to get soft focus in fore and background. The ambient light was so bright it was impossible to see the 3" screen or even the black info strip at the bottom of the view finder even when I blocked the light with my body. So, I was shooting blind because I couldn't see any readings. Out of 75 frames the only save ables were a few that were shot on programmed auto; everything else was blown out. This has happened more than once. Should I get a big black cloth like Mathew Brady or the Delkin pop-up shade? What do you guys do in this situation? I do have old eyes, but I'm not blind yet. I'd be very grateful to hear your experience with this problem.

    Thanks as always, Tom Beard
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2010
  2. IgsEMT

    IgsEMT No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Used to have Delkin - definitely a waste of $ from my end.
    Try not to shoot into the sun :) . Use a cap/hoody of sorts to view the LCD/Viewfinder, and last but not least, if not sure, shoot in RAW. Some will say you should always shoot in RAW, but thats a different topic with MILLIONS of opinions. :)

    Good Luck
     
  3. McMommy

    McMommy TPF Noob!

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    What did you have your aperture and shutter speed set to? (You can click properties on a photo, then details, and view what your camera took the photo at) I've been learning a LOT today about how to control the light, and MyFotoGuy on here has a website that's helped me immensely. http://www.my-fotoguy.com/search/label/Exposure

    I don't know what you already know, but learning the individual parts of the triangle and how to control them on your camera REALLY helped me understand what to do. Maybe you can take a look and go try again? Nothing to lose right?
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2010
  4. Misfitlimp

    Misfitlimp TPF Noob!

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    you kind of answered your own question there pal. dont shoot at midday its kind of the worst time to shoot. altough im sure it can be done. its just not ideal. not shooting at this time would probably fix your viewing problem as well. Your soft focus in the background would be achieved with a wide open apeture.(low number) in bright sun it would blow out your pictures.
     
  5. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    ^^ That.

    Or use ND filters and very powerful lights.
     
  6. c.cloudwalker

    c.cloudwalker TPF Noob!

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    Mid day is, as said above, the worst time of day for photography in general.

    Other than that, you do not need the 3" screen to shoot. Film photographers did just fine without. If you can see the info in the viewfinder, that is another problem and I know only two ways to remedy that.

    1/ is to get very good at figuring out exposure without a meter.

    2/ is to get an external meter. There are some really cheap ones if you get a simple one.

    Cheers.
     
  7. Aye-non Oh-non Imus

    Aye-non Oh-non Imus TPF Noob!

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    As mentioned, use the meter in your viewfinder to determine exposure as it will still be readable. On bright days, the LCD can become useless, with one exception. Set your view mode to Highlights (the blinkies). This will indicate where blown highlights are within the frame. You'll still not likely be able to 'read' the LCD, but the blinkies should be noticeable if you put yourself between the LCD and the sun. Adjust as necessary.

    Get a diffusion panel to reduce the harsh light on your smaller subjects. A small-to-medium sized one can be hand held in you left and trigger with your right. Your shutter speeds should be fast enough to minimize / eliminate camera shake. Obviously a field will not be possible, but a different time of day is the best option.

    Also learn how to use Exposure Compensation to your advantage.
     
  8. creisinger

    creisinger TPF Noob!

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    As mentioned above, use ND filter, diffusing panels and definitely the lowest ISO to be able to shoot with low apertures and high shutter speeds.

    Sorry, but this is trial and error.

    Show us some pics!
     
  9. tom beard

    tom beard TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everybody. I learned a lot. I had no choice about the time of day I shot as I was with a friend who was driving. All of the exposure compensation things you were talking about is why I was out there. I've been studying and need to use various combinations to get comfortable, and just learn the camera. With out being able to see any numbers, I was in a box as to where I was. All of the blown out frames were so bad I just deleted them. Once I learn the camera then I can get a post program and start shooting in RAW. For now, no more shooting at high noon! Many thanks, Tom Beard
     

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