Product pricing question?

Discussion in 'Commercial/Product photography' started by D-50, Feb 11, 2008.

  1. D-50

    D-50 TPF Noob!

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    I was contacted by a jewlery maker to shoot his work. I am meeting with him this week to look at the pieces and quote him a price. From speaking with him it sounds like there is quite a bit to be shot. He said it would be a couple days a week for a month or so. I have shot small amount of products in the past and typically charge $50 a shot but these were small clients with limited pieces max I've done for any one client was 8. I could definatly use the work so I dont want to price myself out but at the same time I'm beyond "portfolio building" and feel my work deserves compensation. I was looking for ballpark figures as to what others charge for larger quantity product shoots. I know the final price depends on the amount and what I feel my time is worth but having not done a job this big I would like to know what others are charging. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you
     
  2. D-50

    D-50 TPF Noob!

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    Just trying to get my subject back on the forum page. any replies are appreciated.
     
  3. Rock

    Rock TPF Noob!

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    I have seen some places that charge as much as $95 a shot for single shots but must of them go down with quantity.

    We start at $75 for single images and go down with quantity....
     
  4. D-50

    D-50 TPF Noob!

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    Thank you for the reply. I do not know the exact number yet but lets say there are 50 to 100 products to be shot. What would be a fair discount to give this company. Like I said before I typically charge $50 a shot. If it was 50 products would going to $25 a shot be a reasonable quantity discount or is that too much/too little of a discount?
     
  5. Rock

    Rock TPF Noob!

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    My rate drops to $38 per for 51-100 but that is what works for me. If you can do them at $25 and make enough to cover your time and PP time, go for it.....
     
  6. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    Of course jewelry can be really technical. Do a couple of test shots to make sure he is happy with the work. Sounds like a big job, so take your time with the bid. Also try and shoot all the pieces at once. Set up for this kind of work can be time consuming. Giving discounts is generally not a good idea especially with jewelry.

    Love & Bass
     
  7. RMThompson

    RMThompson the TPF moderators rock my world!

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    I agree with Craig.

    Do 10 "shots" for something you feel comfortable with, 10 dollars a shot many. See if he likes the quality and then move on.

    It depends on HOW technical you get into the jewelry shots, I've seen them range from 10 minutes to 2 days for one piece.
     
  8. sfaust

    sfaust TPF Noob!

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    No one seems to have asked the first most important question, IMO.

    How will it be shot? Drop and pop on a white background? Something more creative like the jewelry on slate, or sand? Something more complex with props and intricate setting?

    RMThompson said it this best. It could be 10 minutes, or two days, to shoot one piece. It all depends on what the client is expecting, what the photographers skill sets can deliver. For comparison, those sleek shots in magazine ads take days, not minutes to create, and the photographers get paid very well for it ($25K isn't uncommon with usage).

    The client may be asking for a simple image, but have them describe what they are looking for in detail. The image in the magazine that they have in their head might look very simple to them. But, it could be very complex and technical to execute. Asking them you may find out its more than a jewerly piece on seamless paper, and what seems like a simple shot to them is a complex undertaking to shoot.

    I had a client ask me to shoot simple images for their fall 2008 catalog. I'm thinking typical catalog shots with plain backgrounds based on his description. Something I could pop out 3 or 4 an hour and quote as a full day $5,000K shoot. When talking with the client more, his simple white background was a complex set with everything painted white in a room. A much more expensive and elaborate shoot with a custom set, props, everything in the room painted white, etc (maybe $10K alone in building and preparing the set). This happens a lot where the clients vision matches his description perfectly, but is far from reality on the technical, logistical, and/or implemetation side. Make sure you have the client describe the images to you in great detail, and don't rely on their descriptive terms.

    With that said, jewerly isn't an easy thing to shoot for those that don't have excellent lighting skills. You can't just use a light tent and get the sparkle the clients want in their jewelry. If you don't have the skills to pull that off, the client expects that level of quality, and you've priced the job at a few pieces an hour based on 'pop and drop', the budget will go out the window and you'll have your nightmare shoot.

    And I agree with Craig. I don't give discounts on jewelry, reflective objects, or complex objects to shoot. In fact, they are in a separate category and priced higher then everything else. Mainly because they are harder to shoot, and the clients seem to expect a higher quality level. Ie, a diamonds allure is its sparkle and clarity. Its probably the most important aspect of the jewerly to capture, and the client will be looking for that. Thus, right off the bat, its going to take more time, and thus cost more.
     
  9. SrBiscuit

    SrBiscuit TPF Noob!

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    all kidding aside...
    work for gold. gold is way up right now, and the mighty dollar is garbage.
    if he has tons of gold in stock, im sure you could make more based on conversion if you did it that way.
    although it may be more trouble than it;s worth.
    just a thought.
     

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