Professional Headshots

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by Crimsonandwhite, Jan 9, 2009.

  1. Crimsonandwhite

    Crimsonandwhite TPF Noob!

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    I have been hired to do headshots for lawyers here locally. There are 4 of them and then they want a group shot.

    I can make the group shot, no problem. Any tips on the headshots though? I will be using a black back drop and one single softbox. I don't have a hair light yet, so are there some things I need to avoid or do differently? Any advice or tips would be appreciated :)
     
  2. Crimsonandwhite

    Crimsonandwhite TPF Noob!

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    Wow guys................
     
  3. andrew99

    andrew99 TPF Noob!

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    You could pick up a piece or two of foamcore to use as a reflector.
     
  4. NateWagner

    NateWagner TPF Noob!

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    yeah, the main problem I see with most corporate head shots like that is the tendency for them in their dark suits and dark hair to blend into the background. If there is anything you can do to separate their hair with some sort of back light or hair light that would be quite beneficial.

    As was mentioned some sort of foam core or something may help.
     
  5. bdavis

    bdavis TPF Noob!

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    Perhaps back lighting with a reflector in the front to bounce some light on to the face. Or you cold try some side lighting to add a little more dimension. If you only have one light, maybe position them near a window with a soft box on the other side.
     
  6. shuttercraft

    shuttercraft TPF Noob!

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    You could make a DIY grid spot for this job. I now own a grid spot for my beauty dish and strobe heads, when I did not have one I made one myself. I took a lot of drinking straws and glued them together and taped them with duck tape to hold them in place on one of my strobe heads. If you do not have another flash you could use a good clamp light or desk light as a alternative. All you have to do is tape the DIY gridspot to the front of your light and bingo you have a gridspot. Yes, this is much more limiting then using a strobe. You will have to fidle with the white balance a little, but is does work! You should check out Strobist, this site is completely devoted to cheap off camera lighting. That is where this idea came from!

    Use this light to separate your subject from the background

    [​IMG]

    PS- daylight-balanced light bulbs will work best along side your strobes if you are going to use a clamp light.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2009

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