Proffessionalism

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by superhornet59, Apr 7, 2007.

  1. superhornet59

    superhornet59 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2006
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Hey everyone, I haven't been around in a while so you probably dont remember me, I'm Matt and I'm 16, and I got my first DSLR (a D80) in november, though I've been shooting for my school's yearbook for a year before that.

    Anyway so about a week and a half ago my school board held the annual Skills Competition, where all the schools in the region compete in various fields, I represented my school for photography. Out of 18 competitors I was the only one who never took a photography course (i prefer self tought, i feel it leaves more room for expanding your knowledge through curiousity).

    I ended up coming home with second place, I didnt think It'd mean all too much but now people are all over me and want to hire me, but I'm not sure I'm ready, so I was hoping I could get some tips on being proffessional from you guys. I've done a little freelance selling, and I'm building up my modeling portfolio with some girl friends of mine, but this is all very casual and relaxed, and I dont know what I need to do for the transition to something more serious.

    For example, there is an emerging model from one of the other schools in the board, her agent wants me to get some shots of her. I have never worked with an agent before, and I have no clue what to expect. When I freelance, I know I have to compensate the model along with the release, but in this case its being set up, am I paying them or are they paying me? cause I have no boss to pay me...

    Also, what are like the rules of 'ettiquete' in glamour photoraphy? like with my girl friends if i want them to get into a pose that they dont know what I mean, they just let me manipulate them into position. I doubt I can do anything like that with a model. Like little rules are what I don't understand.

    I really want to make the most of this opportunity, but I'm afraid I could tarnish my record as being unproffessional because of a stupid ameature mistake. So I was hoping you guys could run me through a list of Do's and Don'ts in modelling.

    Thanks,

    -Matt
     
  2. gizmo2071

    gizmo2071 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2006
    Messages:
    861
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Toronto, ONT
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    They can hardly expect you to be an incredibley organised photographer and know exactly what your doing at 16.
    Thats something that comes with experience.
    Just practice, practice and more practice. Get friends (not just female) and use them as the models. Just tell them how you want them to pose and show them the positions and expressions yourself if need be. People aren't going to understand whats going on in your mind, so you need to be visual aswell as descriptive.
    Read photography journals and tutorials on portrait work.
    There's so many online that will give you good advice, but reading can only do so much with photography.
     
  3. superhornet59

    superhornet59 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2006
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    The way I usualy do things is find some good articles, then get some subjects to apply what ive read until it's second nature. But in this case, practicing with my friends isnt going to change much, it wont make me much more proffessional unless i know what to do, and all the glamour photography articles i can find are for the model, not photographer.

    Working with an agent somewhat scares me, I'm assuming he/she will be there during the shoot watching and assessing me to some extent. Besides, I know I'm 16 but I dont want to have to use it as a crutch. I still have to stay within certain limits... which I dont know the first thing about.

    This all feels like walking blindfolded really...
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,817
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I think the fact that you are concerned and thinking about these types of things...means that you will be OK. As with most things in life, common sense can be your best guide. Carry yourself in a professional manor and you should be OK. And...at 16, I would think it's perfectly OK to ask plenty of questions as you go.

    In the long run, I think the best thing you can do...would be to apprentice with a working pro. This way you can pick up on the little things.

    In the mean time, it might be enough for you to work TFP (time for prints) or digital files etc. This way, you get to shoot a model and use that for your portfolio and she gets prints or files for her portfolio. If, however, they want to to take shots to be used for something, like an add campaign, then I would certainly demand some kind of payment...I don't know how much though. Maybe call up a pro photographer, lay out your situation and ask what they would charge.
     
  5. RachelJ

    RachelJ TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    IL
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I agree that it's great you're asking all these questions, and that there's NOTHING wrong with it! :)

    As far as who's paying who, ASK! If you're unsure, there's nothing wrong with saying, "Hey, I'm not sure what the compensation is going to be in this case, what are you looking for?". Try to do it as early in the communication process as possible, so that there's nothing lost if the arrangement isn't pleasing to all involved.

    As far as "shoot ettiquite" goes:

    Most models have different preferences on how to shoot. I prefer to be asked to fix whatever needs it over being grabbed at without warning (personal space invasions make me uncomfortable). However, if a photog asks me "can I fix your hair?" I'd oblige if I can't do it myself. Your best bet: ask first if someone needs to be touched, and stay away from *certian* areas (you know which ones...).

    I think one of the best things you can do is invest in a "pose book". It can be one you compile yourself from fashion magazines, Maxim, FHM, stock photos, etc., or one you purchase, or a combo of the 2. I have one that I'm working on compiling (I had one awhile back but left it at the photographer's... told him he could keep it--we're scheduling our 4th shoot, so yea).
    With a book like that, you can have your models look at a pose and get a better understanding of what you're looking for. Also, if all else fails, pose yourself--show them exactly what you're looking for! :) If anything, you'll get a laugh out of the model.

    Additionally, consider having a female assistant on hand (or a makeup artist) to help with 'wardrobe malfunctions', hair placement, etc. Though, with you being only 16 I wonder if you'd need a guardian present for your sake anyway. Underage models *should always* have a guardian present, and I could see that, if the situation were reversed, an underage photog should have one too. Also, make sure you're not shooting anything questionable with underage models... it might get iffy with you being underage as well, but a reputation is fast down the drain if certian lines are crossed, and shooting scantilly clad, obviously sexual underage models is definitely one of them.

    You might want to think about joining Model Mayhem (or other modelling-related group/board--MM just, IMO, has some of the most active forums) and lurk the forums there if you're looking to get involved in shooting models. There are definitely things worth reading over there. And, of course SEARCH topics before asking about them ;)


    Best of luck to you!! And CONGRATS on winning 2nd place in that contest! :thumbup:
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
how to be a proffessionalist
,
p roffessionalism
,

proffessionalism

,
which proffessionalist tells whats wrong with our mind