Pronghorn Doe & Coyote shots

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by Detoff, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. Detoff

    Detoff TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2007
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SW Montana USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Some shots from last friday...

    1
    [​IMG]

    2
    [​IMG]

    3
    [​IMG]

    4
    [​IMG]

    5
    [​IMG]

    6
    [​IMG]

    7
    [​IMG]

    8
    [​IMG]

    9
    [​IMG]

    and a bonus mule deer doe
    10
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Tennessee Landscape

    Tennessee Landscape TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seymour, TN
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    WOW...I love #9....great composition
     
  3. crazy_dragonlady

    crazy_dragonlady TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SE Pennsylvania
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Those pronghorns sure are some ugly creatures! :lol: As far as the photos go I also like #9 the best. How'd you get so lucky and get that coyote to stand by that bush/tree? I'm never that lucky when it comes to photo ops with wildlife.

    Usually by the time I compose the shot and get the camera settled and ready to take the shot the dang critter's gone! :confused:

    Anyways, very nice photos. :thumbup:

    ttfn
    CDL.
     
  4. domromer

    domromer TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2007
    Messages:
    878
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Eugene, Oregon
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Wow very nice. How big of a lens were you using?
     
  5. danir

    danir No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2006
    Messages:
    1,337
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jerusalem, Israel
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Nice series. 9 is my fav.

    Dani.
     
  6. EricD

    EricD TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    1,626
    Likes Received:
    136
    Location:
    Winter Park, Florida
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Very clear crisp shot's. All your shot's are excellent but 7,8 & 9 are my favorites!!

    Great captures!!!!
     
  7. Antarctican

    Antarctican TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Messages:
    24,809
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    The Great White North
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Very crisp shots...you can even see the eyelashes in that first pic. But my fave is #9...the composition with that nearby tree, and the vigilant stance of the coyote, make for a gorgeous shot!
     
  8. Mesoam

    Mesoam TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2007
    Messages:
    1,120
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    CT
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    great shots
     
  9. Detoff

    Detoff TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2007
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SW Montana USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks Everyone, I was pleased with what I ended up with for the day.
     
  10. mr.jangles

    mr.jangles TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MAUI, HAWAII
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    those are some realy nice shots
     
  11. crazy_dragonlady

    crazy_dragonlady TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SE Pennsylvania
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I know other's have asked but could you give us some insight into how you got such close-up photos without losing anything in image quality? It would be very helpful if you could shed some light on what type of equipment you used and just how long you had to wait for setting up the shots. Did you sit in a blind or were you just walking around and happen to come across these?

    ttfn
    CDL.
     
  12. Detoff

    Detoff TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2007
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SW Montana USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Equipment was a Canon Rebel XT, and a Canon 100-400 "L" lens. These images did loose some quality with the resize to the web, I should have sharpened them prior to posting but I got lazy. For image quality, I believe it's a couple of things that contribute to it. First is quality lenses, but that said I've gotten some great shots with the "lowly" Canon 75-300 $150.00 lens. Second is to not shoot with the lens wide open. These were set to about f7.1, and not shoot all the way at 400mm. Also, even though the lens is image stabilized, try for the higher shutter speeds (i.e. 1/400 sec @ 400mm). Keeping the ISO as low as possible. With all that in mind I also shoot in RAW so I have more control over things like white ballance and exposure. .JPG can give some good photos, but I've found that I throw more away and can't salvage some of my minor mistakes with them and keep the quality.

    Now as to getting that close... well I cheated a little bit, these shots were all taken in Yellowstone, and the animals aren't as skittish as outside the park. That being said, keep a low profile and move slowly & in a non-threatening manner. Only move when the animal is comfortable or not watching. If they get nervous, wait it our, or leave, last thing you want to do is stress them out, and risk injury to them or you. The mule deer in the last shot is getting a bit stressed/P.O.'d at me. You can see this by the wider eyes (whites are starting to show), and the ears flattening out. I was about 10 feet from her. The next shot I took after that she really pinned her ears back, and that was my clue to leave her alone and back off. As soon as I backed off she relaxed and went back to feeding. For the Coyote shots, I never got out of the vehicle. Not pressuring it let it roam along at it's own pace sniffing and mousing it's way along. I also noticed the bison trail it was walking in (easier than walking through the snow itself) and was able to anticipate the shot with the tree by figuring out where the trail went. Once it started in that direction I set up the shot and waited for the coyote to come into the frame.

    Sorry this was so long, hope it helped...
     

Share This Page