Protecting a fishey front element

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Naicidrac, Apr 20, 2007.

  1. Naicidrac

    Naicidrac TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Hello all,
    I am thinking about taking the plunge and buying my first fisheye. Now normally with all my lenses I just throw on a UV filter to protect it. Now I know the fisheye I am looking for has a built in lenshood, but is there any other way to protect that front element? It appears that the element sticks out a little.

    Thanks,
     
  2. JDP

    JDP TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I used to subscribe to the school of UV filter always thought, now - meh, I just don't. It's another piece of glass adding to the mess of glass already in there - and you have to buy fairly nice UV filters to really do the lens justice and, well, bah!
    I'd just use the hood, especially with a fisheye - how many times would it really be in any serious danger - danger enough that a chunk of silicon on the front would save it?
     
  3. Naicidrac

    Naicidrac TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks JDP, yes I have been back and forth through the years and finally decided just to stick with the UV filters. I always thought we spend thousands of dollars for these lenses and then the last thing it looks through is a $12.99 UV filter. I changed though after a filter saved me when I broke the filter, but my front element was not damaged. I would have hit the front glass head on. I did a lot of basic test shoots and I could tell no difference between the UV filter on or of mostly, but I decided that they do protect the front glass. I guess I have no choice on the fisheye except the lens hood. I just thought I would try.
     
  4. DSLR noob

    DSLR noob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    1,527
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    well if you DO spend thousands on lenses then you have enough money to buy a $60 filter, and have it match the quality of the glass in your lens.
     
  5. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    lol I would still buy a $20 filter :) The thing is a filter is removable. I under JDP's point of view. I have often taken a picture where I noticed a drop in contrast. This was just flare caused by cheap non antiglare glass. But since it only happens when the sun hits the front element I figured I will just stick with it and if it does cause a visible problem (ghosting or contrast issues) then I'll just screw it off, click and screw it back on. I am more than happy to do that seeing how much lenses cost compared to my 30seconds of effort.

    The thing most people are missing though is how do you get a UV filter on a fisheye, and does the hood do any good in this case either?
     
  6. spazoid1965

    spazoid1965 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cottonwood Shores, TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    A UV filter will not work well with a fisheye lens. The glass sticks out past the end of the lens barrel. It does that for a reason. If it didn't the lens barrel would viginette the image. And so will a filter ring. Most filters will not fit on the lens unless you use a spacer. That will cause alot of viginetting. A lens hood will have the same problem. The best way to protect a fisheye lens is to keep the lens cap on it as much as possible. And to use extreme caution when the lens cap is off.
     
  7. JDP

    JDP TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    hehe, when it comes down to it all, to use a UV filter or not is another religious war, like Coke vs Pepsi. I tried it, used it for many years, then decided that it wasn't for me. The front element is usually one of the strongest as it is anyway, and anything that would smash a UV filter would also probably mess up the lens - especially on todays lenses, where a drop might really screw up the internal focusing rings, ya know?
     
  8. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Messages:
    7,500
    Likes Received:
    478
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    You cannot use conventional screw on filters on fisheyes. fisheyes provide 180 degrees of viewing angle, you'd see the edges of the filter in the frame. I also have yet to see a threaded fisheye.
     
  9. Naicidrac

    Naicidrac TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thank you all. I have an answer now. The main question I had was if a UV filter could even fit on a fisheye and I have that answer now. Thanks to all.
     

Share This Page