Question about filters

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Dylan, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. Dylan

    Dylan TPF Noob!

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    I have a UV haze filter and a polarizer. Can anyone tell me about these? What are they good for. Also, I really want to capture nice sunrise/sunset photo's but I haven't really seen anything good lately. Will a filter enhance this type of picture and what kind should I get. Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I use my polarizer anytime I shoot outdoors in the sun. It really helps to get nice blue skies and nice green foliage. If it's a circular polarizer, you should be able to rotate the front to adjust the effect. The effect is strongest when you are pointed at 90 degrees to the sun. Take the polarizer off when it's dark or when indoors because it will steal some light.

    A UV filter may help when it is hazy...but typically these filters are uses as protection for the front of the lens.
     
  3. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    Usa a UV filter when shooting landscapes or anything long distance. Like Mike says it will reduce the haze and give a sharper, clearer shot.
     
  4. Johnboy2978

    Johnboy2978 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Basically a UV filter is just that. It blocks ultraviolet rays to some extent. People primarily use them however for protection for their lenses, that way if you accidentally bump it against something, hopefully you will scratch or break the filter and not an expensive lens. I've never really used them much until I got a couple of expensive lenses. I recently bought one for a sigma lens I have b/c I figure a $50 investment is worth protecting a $700 lens. I also have one for my 50mm prime lens for the same reason though it was considerably less expensive.

    Polarizing filters allow you to saturate some colors (like the deep blue of the sky or the ocean) and reduce some reflections on surfaces like water and glass. I think they all have a rotating ring (at least my B+H one does) and the amount of the effect can be increased or decreased as you rotate the filter depending on your orientation to the sun. You are supposed to use a circular polarizer if you have an autofocus lens, but the science behind this escapes me at the moment.
     
  5. Dylan

    Dylan TPF Noob!

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    Sweet. I noticed the rotating ring on the front of the polarizer. Took me a few minutes to figure out why the hell I couldn't screw the lens in but I got it. My camera uses ttl method so should I notice the difference when I'm setting up my shot? I should add that my primary is a film camera. Now as for colors, what kinds do you guys use? Should I even bother since I may be able to get a similar effect in post processing? Thanks,

    Dylan
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, you should be able to notice the polarizer effect as you are looking though the viewfinder. Remember, the effect is strongest when shooting at 90 degrees to the sun's rays. It's great for getting blue skies and more definition in fluffy clouds.

    As for colors...I had a sunset filter but I didn't use it all that much. I prefer to edit the digital image.
     
  7. Dylan

    Dylan TPF Noob!

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    I can't wait to try the polarizer. I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks again everyone for the help.
     
  8. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    If you're going to digitally edit you photos you shouldn't need many more filters at all.

    You might want a couple of Neutral Density and Graduated Neutral Density filters if you want slow shutter speeds in bright light.

    You could use colour filters if you wanted to use B&W film. The increase the contrast of some colours to usefull effect like yellow to hide freckles and red to highlight clouds.
     

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