Question regarding Canon lenses

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Rockford, Jan 14, 2010.

  1. Rockford

    Rockford TPF Noob!

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    As a novice, I did a littel research and found what I thought would be a great section of lens from Canon, 100mm f/2.8 marco EF16-35mm f/2.8L II <>USM,EF24-70f/2.8L USM,<> EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM
    These selection of leneses are north of Five grand new.

    Is there other selections of Canon lenese, or other brands that will get you close on a beer budget.

    Example the tamron wide angle 10 -22 3.5 is suppose to be a great bang for the buck.

    Last question, what is the difference between L & L is in the Canon line.
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    There are a great many lenses in the Canon line up, as well as many more that are made by other manufacturers. Thus, there are many options. Also, it will depend on which camera you have because the cameras with smaller sensors can also use lenses with smaller image circles (EF-S lenses) where as the 'full frame' cameras can only use lenses designed for that.

    L is Canon's designation for it's top of the line lenses. Some say it stands for Luxury.
    IS stands for Image Stabilization (the feature that stabilizes the lens to avoid blur from camera shake). Some lenses have it, some don't....both L and regular lenses.
    USM stands for Ultra Sonic Motor, it is the type of auto focus motor.


    As an example of a similar, but cheaper option for your proposed lenses.
    Canon EF 17-40mm F4L
    Sigma 24-70mm F2.8
    Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 (or Canon 70-200mm F2.8 L (no IS) or F4 L IS or F4 L (no IS)
     
  3. Rockford

    Rockford TPF Noob!

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    Thanks MIke,
    Presently have Xti w/18/55 kit lens, 35-105 3.5-4.5 100-300 4.5 - 5.6 ultrasonic. What are these lenses worth, any worth keeping, based on what we are talking about, I should add I will eventually sale my xti and move up once I get alittle more experience .
    Bottom line, want to improve my lens, so when I do move up to a new body, I am ready.

    Sorry, forget to say they are all Canon
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2010
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Those lenses won't be worth much, not to sell anyway...so if you can get some use out of them, keep them.

    When you do upgrade your camera, do you want to get a full frame camera (5D or 1Ds)? or would you more likely be moving to a better 'crop factor' camera like the 50D or 7D?

    Because if you do want to move to a full frame camera, it would be best to avoid EF-S lenses (and similar lenses from other manufacturers). But if you are going to upgrade to a 50D or 7D type of camera, then you would be OK to go with EF-S lenses.

    You can certainly upgrade to some better lenses that what you have now.
    So what is your 'beer budget'?
     
  5. Rockford

    Rockford TPF Noob!

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    Jezzz, I hate to admit this, but I didn't know there was a crop and full body, thats how novice I am. However if you dont ask questions, you dont learn.My initial answer would be another crop, but now you have my curiosity up regarding full body. Whats the difference ?Of the Canon crop line, what would be your suggestion. Likewise if full body. The next question stick with Canon ,or convert to Nikon.In the near future , I hope to be able to play with a few grand on lenses. When we are through with this, I am going to hit the Thank button, I do appreciate your time.
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The 'difference' is mainly in the size of the sensor (the part that records the photo). The 'full frame' sensors are the same size as a frame of 35mm film while the 'crop factor' camera's sensors are somewhat smaller. They are still a whole lot bigger than the sensors you will find in 99% of digicams though.

    There are a few advantages of a larger sensor. One being that it doesn't have to pack in the 'photo-sites' too closely together, which can make for less digital noise (cleaner images). In a nut shell, bigger sensors will usually give you better image quality. Especially at higher ISO levels.
    Another aspect of larger sensors is the Depth of Field. You get a shallower DOF with a lager sensor. You don't always want a shallow DOF, but it's nice to have the option.

    When you compare a crop camera to a full frame camera, the full frame will give you a wider field of view...actually, the standard that we use for comparison is 35mm film cameras, so full frame being that same size is also considered 'standard'.
    So let's say you have a 50mm lens and you are using it on a full frame camera like the 5D II. You are shooting a model and you have her whole body in the photo. Then you take that 50mm lens and put it onto a crop camera. Now because the sensor is smaller, it only 'sees' the middle portion of the image that the lens is projecting into the camera. The result is that you might only be able to see from her knees to her neck (if all else remains the same). In other words, the field of view is narrower on a crop camera (give the same focal length). The ratio for Canon cameras is 1.6. So the 50mm lens, when used on a crop camera, will 'feel' like an 80mm lens on a full frame.
    So using a crop camera can be a PITA for wide angle shooting, but it's an advantage when shooting something farther away.
    Luckily, the camera companies have made up for this, by giving us lenses with rather short focal lengths (wide angle), that will work with crop cameras.
    So while the 'standard zoom lens' for a film camera or full frame camera is something like 24-70mm.....on a crop body camera, the 'standard zoom lens' is more in the range of 17-50mm.

    Now, a lot of people make a big deal about the crop factor. But the truth (according to me ;)) is that it doesn't really matter, unless you are already used to one format. For example, if you were an avid user of a 35mm film camera, then you might have a certain expectation for a 50mm lens....and you might be surprised when you try to use that lens on a crop body camera. But if you don't have those preconceived expectations, then there is nothing to worry about. What you see is pretty much what you get....you don't have to constantly think about the crop factor.

    Getting back to your issue of what lenses to buy, the important thing to know about all of this, is that some lenses are made to work with the crop cameras only. In the Canon line up they are the EF-S lenses. So if you do plan on getting a full frame camera, in the for foreseeable future, then you might want to avoid buying those types of lenses.

    In the Canon line up, the Rebel series and the mid-level (pro-sumer) cameras are all 1.6 crop cameras. This includes the 40D, 50D and the new 7D. If I was going to buy one today, I'd look at the 50D or the 7D.
    There are two current 'full frame' models. The 5D (current versions is the mark II) and the 1Ds (mark III is the current one, I think). There is also the 1D (currently mark IV), which is a 1.3 crop. The 5D II is basically the same size of camera as the 50D but with the full frame sensor, it gives outstanding image quality. The 1 series cameras (1D and 1Ds) are Canon's pro cameras. They are bigger and much more robust. They are sealed up so you could use them in a rain storm. They have many features not found on the other cameras, but they are also very expensive at $4000 for the 1D and $8000 for the 1Ds (although I'm sure they can be found for less).
    One difference between the different models is AF performance. The 1 series cameras have all the AF technology that Canon can think of, while the 5D II is actually behind the 7D. So if action/sports shooting is something you are into shooting, look for a camera that has top notch AF.

    Switching to Nikon? I wouldn't recommend switching. Not that there is anything wrong with Nikon, but switching from one to the other is usually a wasteful, costly ordeal. Although, if I had to choose which DSLR is the best buy, in terms of getting full frame & top quality AF, I'd say that the Nikon D700 is probably it.

    But the good thing about these systems, is that you can still use your 'lowly' XTi with top quality lenses, and get fantastic results.
     
  7. Rockford

    Rockford TPF Noob!

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    First and formost, This thread has brought me from the dark into the light.
    Thank you very much with staying with it, and spending this much time with and for me. To you sir, I raise a glass of red. Thank you

    Since so much went into this, may I suggest you consider posting this as a stickey.

    From reading all of this , I walk away with the fact that I can just add better lenses to my exisiting xti or sell off every thing and go with either Nikon or Canon Systems. You have given me much to ponder.

    Yesterday I was reading a thread where the debate was a nikon d90 or d700. Others shined in a said the d700s. What's the S version , as they didnt discuss what the diffrence was.
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'm a Canon shooter, so I'm not fully up to speed on Nikon gear. But I think that the 's' would be an updated version that also shoots video. As far as I can tell, it's just a rumor though, and there is no actual D700s.
     

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