Questions about gaining and maintaining the best color management accuracy…

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by lbphotogirl, Apr 16, 2008.

  1. lbphotogirl

    lbphotogirl TPF Noob!

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    I've done the research, but the more research I do the more confused I become…

    Cost is not an issue… What is the best way to achieve the best/consistent color management accuracy? What is considered to be the best monitor calibrator and the best monitor to purchase on the market for windows?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    I don't know as much as I wish I did about high end color calibration...I hope someone can offer up some good info.

    From what I've been hearing, you will want a monitor with 'LT'...Look up Table calibration, rather than a simple profile calibration. I don't even know what that is really...but that's what I've heard.

    A lot of cheap monitors can't display a really wide range of colors...so you would probably want something with a large display gamut.

    THIS looks interesting but I don't know much about it.
     
  3. bapp

    bapp TPF Noob!

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    If your serious about photo editing you'll need to get yourself (or at least borrow) a spyder. See details below.

    http://www.imaging-resource.com/ARTS/MONCAL/CALIBRATE.HTM

    As for windows monitors...ehhh Buy a Mac!! Haha, sorry, bu they are simply superior for photo editing!

    You may be able to get a super duper high def Windows monitor.. but I don't know much about that!!
     
  4. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Depends

    The NEC SpectraView NEC2180WG-LED-SV http://www.necdisplay.com/Products/Product/?product=d61cea64-a46e-4095-85b6-ed62136d058e is probably the first and last word in colour fidelity, but there are very good alternatives.

    Note that all the NEC spectraview monitors have internal lookup tables and come with an iOne Display II colorimeter.

    Oh and the manual specifically says do not use the Spyder with this monitor as it is incapable of handling the wide gamut. While the Spyder is the most recommended on here, the OP was asking for the best, and from what I've seen the Spyder is the most entry level.

    Btw for the record I own an NEC LCD2690WUXi-SV and according to the calibration software it displays 97% of the AdobeRGB gamut with an average Delta E of 0.49. I can hardly justify spending $1000 more and get 5" less screen for my money just to improve this figure.

    Other good monitors are made by Eizo and Samsung too.
     
  5. PattiS

    PattiS TPF Noob!

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    I use eye one display 2, and I've been very happy with the results.
    I calibrate every two weeks or so. :)
     
  6. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    Garbz makes a good point: start with the right monitor. Connect by DVI rather than by an analogue connection. Calibrate the monitor regularly.

    Windows XP will now support multiple monitors, each with their own profiles, without having to use multiple graphics cards. This is essentially the same as a Mac, at last (in that respect). Bapp seems to suggest that there are Windows monitors and Mac monitors. There aren't. I use the same LaCie and Cintiq monitors for my Mac as for my Windows PCs, all using the same DVI interface. If you wanted to you could use an Apple Cinema monitor on a PC running Windows.

    The Eye-One Display 2 is a good calibrator. If money is no object, and you produce prints, you might want to consider an Eye-One Pro.

    Of the generic calibration software that I have used, ColorEyes has been the best, but a monitor-dedicated system would usually be preferable.

    Best,
    Helen
     

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