Questions on chemical/developing steps

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by rob91, Mar 9, 2008.

  1. rob91

    rob91 TPF Noob!

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    Just a couple things. The darkroom I use at school has a chemical I don't hear mentioned much, "Hypo Clearing Agent". After fixing I rinse for a couple minutes, then HCA about 1-2, then a 5 minute water rinse followed by photoflo. Is the HCA necessary?

    Also, one step I was taught was to start off with a water rinse (fill with same temp water, agitate for a minute) before putting the developer in. Does anyone else do this?

    I just wonder because these steps were taught for use with Kodak films. When I start going in with some fuji and ilford, as well as some expired Kodak Tmax I will be shooting, are such steps are necessary? I don't see them listed on the manufacturer's website, or many other developing sites for that matter.
     
  2. Early

    Early TPF Noob!

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    I believe you'd have to wash the film for a good half hour without it, so it basically saves water. A must for fiber based papers.
     
  3. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

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    I never use it myself for rinsing. After I fix, I rinse the film for 7 minutes in running water. Haven't had a problem yet. I could go to 10 minutes if I wanted, but, eh, I'm lazy.
     
  4. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    many years ago, a pre-wet was used as the films were much thicker.
    these days especially with 35mm and 120 film many feel it is not useful.

    with regard to hypo clear and film. again it is no longer necessary.
    With fiber papers yes, it will decrease the washing times.

    a very popular washing method for film is the ilford 5-10-15 method which we have been using to conserve water.

    you fill the tank with water and agitate 5 full inversion, dump, re-fill, agitate 10 times, dump and re-fill agaitate 20 times. followed with a photo-flow in distilled water.
     
  5. doobs

    doobs TPF Noob!

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    I do use it, and I do a pre-soak as well. Why? Hell if I know. Not my chemicals. I was taught this way.
     
  6. Early

    Early TPF Noob!

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    I'd stick with that to be on the safe side. It's a small step. Any residual fixer remaining will most likely degrade the negative in time.
     
  7. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The old 'To presoak or not to presoak' question. I do for one minute. Let's the water get into the emulsion to promote more even developing, brings the film, the tank and the reels up to processing temperature before adding developer, supposed to make the film more resistant to air bubbles during developing. Do it or don't, honestly makes no difference one way or the other.
     
  8. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Keep in mind a pre-soak is not advised for all films. If you check the Ilford website, they actually recommend against a pre soak, as this can lead to uneven development - exactly what you are trying to avoid!

    I believe many of us get taught the old school methods and some of them simply no longer apply with modern films.

    I also agree with Ann about the water-saving final rinse steps. I do this all the time now. I believe this also came from Ilford labs. It saves a lot of water and is apparently a more effective method of washing.
     
  9. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I do like ann's suggestion on final rinsing. I'm gonna see how it goes with TMX, Noepan 400 and Efke 25 with HC110, K's Ind Stop and Kodafix. Would save time and a lot of water. Course I run it at only a trickle but still twenty minutes adds up (no hypo).
     

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