Questions on using the nikon D50

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by GreenV63, Aug 9, 2006.

  1. GreenV63

    GreenV63 TPF Noob!

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    Hi i recently bought the Nikon D50 and im using a 28-80mm lens that came with the camera. Im not really interested in buying a new lens yet, im just trying to get used to the camera first. I was wondering, ive been wanting to take pictures of my newborn baby, but the flash is wayy to bright for me to be taking pictures of him with it. so i try to take pictures of him without the flash, i noticed that some pictures came out fine but then most of them would just blur. how do i get it from stop bluring, while not using a flash? thanks, and sorry, im pretty new at all this, im trying to learn as much as i can on my own.
     
  2. bigfatbadger

    bigfatbadger TPF Noob!

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    Don't worry, everyone on this forum has known that feeling once.

    Basically, you need to know about the relationship between ISO, Shutter Speed and Aperture, try here as a start. In brief though, think of the amount of light that you need to let into the camera for any given picture as being constant. The longer the shutter speed you use will allow more light into the camera, as will using a larger aperture, but they both have trade offs. A longer shutter speed means that any movement of the subject is recorded, so you get blurry pictures, whereas a larger aperture means that you get shorter depth of field, so parts of the picture that were furthest away from the focal point will become blurry.

    If this all sounds confusing at the moment, don't worry, you'll get it, and the D50 if a fine camera to start with. For the moment, try turning the ISO up, this will allow you to stick with the same settings, but your pictures may get a bit more grainy.

    More specific tips around photographing babies can be found here
     
  3. GreenV63

    GreenV63 TPF Noob!

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    alright i first read that page about taking pictures of babies and hes says this:

    I’m no lighting expert but have found that my best results have been when I’ve used my flash in a bounce flash way. This diffuses the light somewhat which leaves Xavier less washed out, means he’s not blinded by the light from it (we don’t want to blind our little ones by our photographic obsession) and generally gives a fairly natural looking shot.
    If you don’t have a bouncable flash try experimenting with a diffuser (either buy one or experiment with making one).

    What does bounce flash way mean? does he mean to kind of block the light with something, so the light is not so strong on the baby?

    thank you by the way for your help :)
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Bounce flash is only achieved by using a hot shoe flash, with a bounce/swivel head. You can turn the flash head and point it up, to "bounce" the light off of a reflector, or a ceiling, or wall, etc....

    Your best bet is to learn some about photography, specifically the things that Jon mentioned, like aperture, ISO, and shutter speed.

    I have found this site to be a good resource: http://www.photo.net/learn/making-photographs/
     
  5. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    I just got a D50 too... congrats on the camera and the baby!!!

    One of the best rules of thumb I've stumbled upon is sticking a 1 over your focal length and then keeping the shutter speed faster than that number to avoid camera shake.

    So if I was you... I'd compose the shot roughly how you want it and then take note on the side of the lens which focal length is selected. Hold the shutter release 1/2 way and see what the light meter inside the viewfinder is recommending for shutter speed. If the shutter is slower than 1/Focal Length you need to add light. To avoid a flash maybe move the baby closer to a window.

    It can definitely sound overwhelming but you just have to learn what the numbers mean that the camera is giving you and how they relate to each other. Then you're on your way!
     
  6. LWW

    LWW TPF Noob!

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    Don't forget to adjust for the 1.5 factor with this being a digicam...IOW shooting at 28MM would be 1/30 sec X 1.5 = 1/45 second.

    LWW
     
  7. LWW

    LWW TPF Noob!

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    Here are some easy and inexpensive to free ways to better your results:

    -Buy/borrow an a monopod or tripod.

    -Put the camera in manual mode and set the shutter speed for an accurate exposure and bump the ISO up to 800 to help.

    -Position yourself with your back against a wall. Spread your feet a couple feet apart and brace yourself against wall and floor solidly but not so solid that you are straining as this will induce body vibration. Hold the cam with your right hand. Cradle the lens in your left hand firmly but not with a death grip. Compose the shot carefully. At the moment you click the shutter do 2 extra things:

    1-Make sure that you are neither inhaling nor exhaling, if you want a quick example of how much movement this removes try pointing your finger at arm's length at an object and watch how much the aim point moves with each breath.

    2-When you click the shutter be aware that you ONLY use just the tip of your index finger to apply pressure. It is human nature to subconciously squeeze the entire hand when depressing a shutter.

    It takes a try or 3 to get comfortable with those 2 items but they will do wonders for your low shutter speed photography. The earlier steps just add aditional stability.

    Using this technique I haved used a 300MM Nikkor down to 1/30 second and still gotten decent results. With a tree to brace against I've done 1/15.

    I hope this helps.

    LWW
     
  8. gundy74

    gundy74 TPF Noob!

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    you can turn down the flash from the menu:

    hit menu
    go to the submenu with the pencil (not sure its exact name)
    scroll down and go to flash level
    then shoose a negative number for the flash output
     
  9. bigfatbadger

    bigfatbadger TPF Noob!

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    You can also hold down the same button you use to pop up the flash at the same time as the exposure compensation button, and rotate the control wheel.

    I think
     

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