Questions regarding HIE

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by clarinetJWD, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. clarinetJWD

    clarinetJWD The Naked Spammer Staff Member

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    Before I load up my beautiful roll of Kodak HIE Infrared film, I thought I should be completely clear on how to shoot it. I know that with film, the only filter you really need is a red filter, but my question is on exposure. Will the internal light meter be reasonably accurate, or do I sort of guess on exposure?

    Also, if anyone knows anything about the Nikon 2020 body, does it fog IR film, or will I be fine? Thanks!
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Joe, what ISO did you want? I shoot slightly below 400 and use a #25 red filter - makes meter reading TTL much easier. I trust the meter on my old Pentax, but usually will bracket 1+ and 1- just to make sure of a good density spread.

    Me no know Nikon. :razz: The only question there is if it has an IR film advance, which is the main culprit of film fogging. I'm a broken record when I say MOST times the fogging is supposed to be limited to the sprocket holes and not creep into the frame, but I've yet to test this theory on my newer Pentax MZ.

    I'm excited to hear you're giving it a try! :) Are you going to develop it yourself?
     
  3. clarinetJWD

    clarinetJWD The Naked Spammer Staff Member

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    Thanks...I'll have to check the ISO, I can't remember which I bought from so long ago (bought it just before winter, silly Joe...)

    I have not been able to find anywhere whether this camera has an IR film advance. I know it has an automatic film advance, but whether it is IR, or whether it affects the film I don't know...

    As for developing...no. Just don't have the equipment, space, know how, or time...so that kind of rules that one out! :lol:
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Just drop it off at a lab in person, if at ALL possible...so you can look someone in the eye and carefully explain that it is HIE, real IR film and if they pop the film canister top off on the counter, you'll have to kill them.... :sillysmi: You need to trust that they know how to handle the stuff.

    And by, *what ISO do you want* I meant, did you want to set it for speed or at a slower ISO? Sorry, I wasn't very clear - but you're not forgetting anything. :) HIE isn't rated, so there's nothing on the box to forget. I personally love to set it kinda fast so I don't have to be a slave to a tripod (I'm lazy like that). Just set your ISO, pop on that filter, meter TTL, and bracket your shots. (And then be sure to tell the lab what your ISO was.)

    I think you'll do fine! In fact, knowing your style of shooting, HIE ought to be a dream for you. I'm excited for ya! :thumbup:
     
  5. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    1) You can shoot it at whatever speed you like.

    2) Terri, how the hell are you getting a meter reading? I only shoot HIE and 820c will an 89B. Are you using a 29 or something?
     
  6. clarinetJWD

    clarinetJWD The Naked Spammer Staff Member

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    Thanks guys...guess I'll set it at 400. I have an IR filter for my digital, so in this case the goal is speed.
     
  7. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    :lol: Neither - a #25. I could do the same with a 29, I suppose, but why make it so hard when it's HIE? I find it so much more flexible - and pleasurable -than the 820c. ;)

    There is way too much angst and hype over the stuff, as far as I'm concerned. Following a few simple rules, I've gotten great results from the very first roll, and have my little method, so I'm sticking with it.

    Joe, ISO 400 is great with HIE; I'm not certain what filter is used with digital but I don't think it's a plain old #25 red...? I promise, that is all you need.

    At any rate, good luck, have fun with it - and please show us your results! :)
     
  8. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    I'll grant you that it's much easier to use with a 25. But in all honesty I feel like 1) it's a waste of the film's capabilities, and 2) a lot of the IR stuff I've seen from you has been accentuated by the bromoil process.
     
  9. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I use some of my negatives for various *alternative* photographic processes. ;) No question about it - and don't forget hand coloring, or Polaroid image transfers from negatives, either!

    I'll probably take some more HIE negatives with me to my lith printing class, too. I'm really looking forward to seeing how well they take to it, as this workshop's instructor, Tim Rudman, lauds IR negatives and lith printing as a very happy marriage for this particular technique.

    I do have a few I'm very pleased with as straight silver gelatin prints, that I don't think I'll manipulate any further. They're either on my website or possibly posted in my gallery here. :)

    I don't see how using a #25 is a waste of the film's capabilities, however. I suppose it all depends on personal taste. A #87 is overkill for this film, IMO, simply because a lot of detail is lost when that much blue light is blocked. A good result is dependent on subject matter, as well. I'm personally not going for snowy looking landscapes or blown highlights.

    A #25 filter when the film is rated at around 400 ISO still gives negatives with good detail in both shadow and highlight, while blocking enough blue light to give that distinctive IR *halo* or glow. In addition, the fast speed allows more freedom of movement when shooting and TTL metering. I fail to see any overwhelming advantage to more opaque filters or slower ISOs for a film that gives beautiful results not demanding either. The 820, in fact, gives disappointing results by comparison. Just personal preference.
     
  10. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    The halo isn't specific to IR, it's specific to HIE, which it seems is why you like it so much. 820c has an anti-halation backing. But i'm going to give your HIE @400/25 thing a try.
     
  11. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    True; it would have been more accurate to say "HIE glow", or aura. For all the added caution in handling it, I do find HIE a superior IR film for these enhanced (IMO) results. There is no other film quite like it.

    I'd love to see your results posted here, should you give the higher ISO/#25 filter a try. :)
     

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