Questions regarding Ilford Delta 100

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Victorianeliza, Oct 13, 2009.

  1. Victorianeliza

    Victorianeliza TPF Noob!

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    So I'm shooting these large expansive parking garages a night with a Mamiya C 330 and Ilford Delta 100 however, I know Ilford film can be tricky. I've had a few failed attempts at getting the right exposure but, I was just experimenting. The first attempt listening to my light meter reading off a grey-card provided me with a few decent negatives the second however, were all-in-all far too dense. The first attempt was shot slightly give or take given the angle of the shot at about 1 @ f 2.8. However, I found myself having to do a little more dodging and burning then I would have liked, and I definitely want a greater depth of field (at least f11 quality). Any suggestions? I know reciprocity can be an issue...
     
  2. compur

    compur No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Too much density in the negs can be caused by over exposure and/or
    over-development and/or over agitation in development.

    Generally, reciprocity issues would result in under-exposure, not over
    exposure.

    You need to provide more information about the problem.

    Is your camera's shutter accurate at 1 second? Many older leaf shutters
    can get sticky with age and give a significantly longer exposure, especially
    at the slow speeds.

    Have you tried bracketing your exposures?

    How are you developing these? If you're having a lab do it, that could be
    the problem, i.e., lab error.

    You say you had to do too much dodging and burning. Are you sure the
    negs are too dense or are they too contrasty?

    And, are you talking about darkroom printing or digital manipulation? If
    darkroom printing, that raises other issues of controlling contrast in printing,
    etc.
     
  3. Sjixxxy

    Sjixxxy TPF Noob!

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    My advice, if you are shooting night scenes, dump the Delta and get some Acros 100.

    No really, Delta 100 starts needing reciprocity correction after 1 second, Across doesn't need it until after two minutes of exposure. and even then it only and extra 1/2 stop out until 20 minutes of exposure.

    So, say you want to shift 1 sec at f2.8 to f/11. Four stops, so 16 seconds at F/11.

    Using the Delta 100 reciprocity formula of exposuretime raised to 1.68, we get an exposure of 106 seconds. Across 100, shoot at 16 seconds and be done with it.

    Are your negatives too dense (dark all over) or too contrasty (good in the shadows, highlights really dark)?

    If it is too dense, you're metering is off. If it is too contrasty, either cut development time, or switch to a compensating developing method.
     
  4. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

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    Over exposure causes an increase in density across the whole density range. Over developement (too long a time, too high a temp, or too much agitation) causes an increase in density proportional to the exposure; shadows are not affected at all or only very very slightly, mid tones modestly, and highlights a large amount.

    then shoot at f/16!
     

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