RAW Vs. JPEG

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by wmc1117, Jun 20, 2009.

  1. wmc1117

    wmc1117 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2008
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am sure this question has been asked before, but I am just curious as to what the difference and benefits of shooting RAW vs. shooting JPEG is?
     
  2. silverbody

    silverbody TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Jpeg-

    - Sharper image than RAW
    - Compressed on camera
    - Higher in contrast than RAW
    - Smaller file size than RAW

    RAW-

    - Not as sharp
    - lower contrast
    - higher in dynamic range than jpeg
     
  3. epp_b

    epp_b No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,135
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    True North Cold and Freezing
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    RAW: more exposure latitude in post processing, can change white balance at a whim later on, but takes up more disk space and is proprietary

    JPEG: universal image format, compression used properly is usually unnoticeable, smaller file size, but has less exposure latitude and the white balance isn't explicitly adjustable

    I usually shoot JPEG unless I'm unsure of the white balance or I know I'll need to underexpose and pull out details later on.
     
  4. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    38,229
    Likes Received:
    5,005
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    A RAW data is about the same as a negative was to film. It is a master file of exactly what the image sensor captured. All RAW files need post processing.

    A negative (or RAW file) can be manipulated in numerous different ways to make a variety of prints, without altering the quality of the negative.

    A JPEG is an image print file. It is made from a RAW image. The processing that is applied to it in the camera, at a minimum, is decided by the camera manufacturer, not the photographer. The photographer can alter some of those global settings in the camera. Settings like contrast, saturation, and sharpening. But, the changes are global and not targeted.

    A JPEG is essentially a print (not a negative) so you can't do all that much to it without substantially changing it's quality. Many times the in camera processing clips the highlights and shadow detail and since there is no negative, it is what it is.
     
  5. paulk_68

    paulk_68 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2009
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    If I'm shooting for a client, I will shoot in both RAW and JPEG. Having JPEG files downloaded with the RAW files has cut down on my post processing tenfold. Having the RAW files gives me a sense of security if I messed something up, and it doesn't take too much to delete them after I have gone through all of the shots.
     
  6. Bitter Jeweler

    Bitter Jeweler Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2009
    Messages:
    12,984
    Likes Received:
    4,971
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Isn't that like throwing away your negatives?
     
  7. Samanax

    Samanax TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Messages:
    2,562
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kaneohe, Oahu
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
  8. Alex Manfredini

    Alex Manfredini TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Miami
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Raw means "uncooked" and JPG are "cooked" filtered by the camera software. If you want to get the whole information capture by the camera, you should shoot as RAW
     
  9. paulk_68

    paulk_68 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2009
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The finished images get burnt to the clients DVD and a copy is made that I hold onto. There really is no point in keeping them on a hard drive after the client has received their DVD with the finished images on it.

    The only way that has come back to bite me so far, is not having a lot of images to show on my website without digging through those I have on DVD/CD's (which I'm too lazy to do). The (crappy) pics that are there now will be replaced with some better images over the next two weeks if anyone is wondering how I'm making money at this :lmao:
     
  10. wmc1117

    wmc1117 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2008
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you guys...reading up on white balance now!
     
  11. RJohnston

    RJohnston TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Ive done similar things. Burn to DVD the RAW files, create a TIF of any file I want to on my HD. With Lightroom all my RAW files are only added after burning them to a DVD. The DVDs are like my negative storage files, never destroyed.

    Years later Ive gone back and re printed a negative, because learning a lot in the meantime, have been able to use some creative ideas to make a much better print.

    You can do things with negatives or raw files you can not do with a TIF or JPG and keeping them costs very little. Keeping only the catalog for Lightroom on the HD, takes a lot less space. Naming the DVD with an appropriate name and folders, means being able to locate the specific one easily. All my DVDs contain the date and the folder contains time of day. Scanning through images using keywords in Lightroom makes it easy to find that info.

    Once, almsot 15 year after a sitting I did for a family with 8 children. Also shot each child individually in case the group was not satisfactory. They bought only the group shot.

    One of them was killed coming home from school on a bicycle.
    They got in touch with me to see if I still had the individual child.
    Made them an 11x14 which was almost lifesize of the face, then gave it to them. There was no way I'd have charged for it.

    We never know how important one negative or original will be.
    Because some ancestors felt the same way I do, today we have over 2000 family photos on our family website from the latest newborns, back to Tintypes and the Civil War.
     

Share This Page