Re-Use Stop and Fix?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Commonman, Apr 26, 2008.

  1. Commonman

    Commonman TPF Noob!

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    I'm developing some film in a small tank. I'm going to develop 2 or 3 rolls tonight. After using the stop and the fix for the first roll can I pour them back into their temporary containers (the plastic jugs I use for my working solutions not the original bottles) and re-use the solutions for the 2nd and 3rd rolls of film?
     
  2. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I think so. I was reading on this topic just the other day since I'm about to get into it. The book (written in the 70s) said record how many rolls you use your developer and fixer on. It didn't mention stop bath since it recommended a water wash.
     
  3. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yes you can. It would take many more than 3 rolls to exhaust freshly prepared stop and fix. However, be aware than once mixed the solutions don't always last very long.
     
  4. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    Typical fixer capacity is around 10 rolls per litre of working strength fixer. That's 10 rolls of 135-36 or 120; or 10 sheets of 10x8; or 5 rolls of 220; or 40 sheets of 4x5 etc. The fixer manufacturer may give guidance on capacity in their online literature. Not all films 'exhaust' fixer at the same rate - the amount of silver iodide in the emulsion is a key factor. The more iodide, the less the capacity of the fixer. T-Max films have a comparatively high iodide content.

    One way of testing is to check the clearing time with a piece of dry film. Most people use the leader from the end of a 35 mm cassette. Dip it into the fixer before it is used the first time, agitate it gently and record the time to clear the film. If you repeat the same test with the same film and the same judgment on when clearing is complete the fixer can be considered to be 'exhausted' when the clearing time has doubled.

    You can also use the clearing time as a guide to the fixing time - fix for at least twice the clearing time.

    The main problem likely to occur with 'exhausted' fixer is that it results in silver complexes that are difficult to wash out. The film may look clear, but some silver compounds remain, along with the silver image produced in the developer.

    Stop can be reused many times, though water does just as well in most cases - as long as your technique and timing are consistent. If you are using an alkaline fixer, it's best not to use an acid stop.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  5. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Just curious, what film and chemistry are your processing with?
     
  6. Commonman

    Commonman TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Helen. I will have to research to determine Kodak "Kodafix" is alkaline or acidic (unless someone out there happens to know).

    Mr. Walrath, this time around, I was using Kodac Tri-X 400 in the Mamyia 645 and T-Max 400 in the Nikkormat. Hc-110, developer and Kodafix for a fixer.

    Everyone else: Thank you for contributing.
     
  7. Commonman

    Commonman TPF Noob!

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    According to the label, Kodak Kodafix solution contains sodium bisulphite, Ammonium sulphite, ammonium thiosulphate, acetic acid, Boric acid , aluminum sulphate, water and sodium acetate.

    It's been a long time since I had Chemistry 101 but I would think that if this solution contains 2 types of acid, it is acidic and not alkaline.

    Therefore, using it after Kodak Indicator Stop, I'm guessing would be OK.

    However, I've taken note that a number of contributors had said using the stop is not necessary. Water will do fine. I'm just concerned that water will not stop the development as effectively as water. Should I put this fear away? Or, should I go right to the fix after pouring out the developer?
     
  8. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I know that TMAX films will reduce the usefulness of HC110 over time but that doesn't stop me, That's me film and developer. And yeah, HC110 is alkaline. Kodak Ind Stop and Kodafix is acidic.
     

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