Rock Climbing Photography

Discussion in 'Photojournalism & Sports Gallery' started by joshua kasumovic, Aug 28, 2017.

  1. joshua kasumovic

    joshua kasumovic TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Aspen Colorado
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    IMG_0429.JPG IMG_0104.JPG IMG_0397.JPG IMG_0123.JPG Hi All,

    I'm aspiring adventure photographer looking to break into commercial and editorial work. Here are some of my best rock climbing photos from the past year. All constructive criticism and advice is welcomed! IMG_0429.JPG


     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. idcanyon

    idcanyon No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2015
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    57
    Location:
    Idaho, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    First and last (same pic?!) - In a way I want to like this one best because it shows a crux moment, but I really want to see his whole face!
    #2 - This is a good shot to give a client as part of their album, but it won't do for a portfolio. To step it up you need the climber to wear bolder/brighter eye catching colors, and find a way to frame him in front of the distant background instead of the continuing line of cliffs.
    #3 - Similar to #2, good shot for an album, but not for a portfolio. To step it up to portfolio quality you'd need ripped muscles showing, a move in progress, and possibly more height.
    #4 - Once again, I want to see his face. This is kind of an awkward moment, gear eating climber. No, really I do get whats happening--he had to hold the carabiner to unclip it from his rack and then he had to move his hand to the cam to place it--but its still awkward.

    In all of these you really do have the right idea. You are shooting top down or from the side (no butt shots!).

    Unlike many conventional sports photographers, adventure sports photographers must work harder and possibly be more skilled than the participants. To get the very best shots you have to be skilled enough to travel with the client AND haul photo gear, AND have the energy to keep up and keep shooting, especially when conditions get hard because that's when photos really get good. For big wall or trad climbing/moutaineering you can avoid lead climbing and just ascend your teams ropes. For sport climbing you'll need to have the skills to anchor a rope and then descend/ascend it at will to follow the climbers and get to the right position for the shots you want.

    For portfolio building see if you can get some climbers to go out for free and actually climb for you instead of you photographing for them. That way you can ask them to be in just the right position, pose, grimace, and flex (even though they might be a 5.14 climber on a 5.8 route).

    If you don't already, subscribe to magazines for climbing and any other adventure sports you are interested in shooting. These have lots of pictures, are what the climbers are used to seeing, and probably what they are hoping to receive. If you can, find photos of the locations in the picture and try to determine where the photographer shot from, and at what time of day.

    Good luck!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2013
    Messages:
    6,279
    Likes Received:
    1,826
    Location:
    US
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I've done sports and events, mostly hockey. I can take photos with players shooting pucks at me but I can't look down in #2! lol I'd say it might be more effective to shoot a little tighter or crop these down some to bring the viewer in closer. I think the first/last one is kind of cool, it just might have been better if he'd looked into the camera.

    I found sports can often be the timing, and it takes a lot of practice. You could take a look at Sportsshooter but the site hasn't been as active as it used to be. Try looking up Dave Black Photography; I did a workshop with him some years ago and he's done a variety of sports including the Olympics where you might find something more nontraditional than the usual ball sports. Maybe look up Scott Grant, he has posted on here but I haven't noticed him on here in some time; he's done paralympics and tromped up a mountain to shoot skiing etc. Might give you some idea what skill level pros have and what to try going for in quality, etc.

    edit - Found Scott's site. Scott Grant Photography | Scott Grant Photography
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. joshua kasumovic

    joshua kasumovic TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Aspen Colorado
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Yeah not sure how that happened... Thank you for all of the feedback!! I will definitely apply those tactics in future shoots ;) Cheers!
     
  5. joshua kasumovic

    joshua kasumovic TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Aspen Colorado
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thank you for checking out my photos and the feedback is much appreciated! I checked out Davit Black; A lot of talent!!
     
  6. Dean_Gretsch

    Dean_Gretsch TPF Supporters Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2016
    Messages:
    2,891
    Likes Received:
    1,756
    Location:
    Northeastern Pennsylvania
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit


    I like the views you give in these.
     
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page