Rooftops

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by PlasticSpanner, Dec 18, 2005.

  1. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    I would like to achieve my own style of urban subjects like this but I'm not sure if it's boring or interesting so there's a couple of things I'd like your opinions on please.

    1/ is the subject itself interesting enough to get more than a passing glance?

    2/ Is the composition OK or should I include more sky/cut out more of the hedge?

    3/ Does the grain in the sky look OK or too much?

    This is a fairly new type of subject for me so I'm starting from scratch nearly! Many thanks for your time.

    Shot on PAN 400 B&W film, 1/250 sec, f16.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. crawdaddio

    crawdaddio TPF Noob!

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    1- Not really, but well framed, IMHO

    2-Composition is good

    3-Yes, too much grain for THIS TYPE OF SHOT, I however like film grain, especially when it suits the photo.

    P.S. Well exposed. Film is dying, and I'd love too see it come back.

    Nice shot.
     
  3. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    I think I know the kind of photo you are talking about and what drew you to take this one. Here are my thoughts:

    I'd come down to just above the leftmost antenna.
    I'd come up to just above the top of the hedge.
    Then in on the left to crop out the tree.

    This gets rid of a lot of extranious stuff and puts the focus on the repeating pattern of the roof.

    Grain can be nice, but I think it hurts here, as it makes the shingles harder to differentiate. Maybe playing with the contrast/curves could help.
     

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